You are not logged in.

How many of Australia's ground-nesting birds are likely to be at risk from the invasive Cane Toad (Rhinella marina)?

Beckmann, Christa and Shine, Richard 2012, How many of Australia's ground-nesting birds are likely to be at risk from the invasive Cane Toad (Rhinella marina)?, Emu, vol. 112, no. 2, pp. 83-89, doi: 10.1071/MU11028.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title How many of Australia's ground-nesting birds are likely to be at risk from the invasive Cane Toad (Rhinella marina)?
Formatted title How many of Australia's ground-nesting birds are likely to be at risk from the invasive Cane Toad (Rhinella marina)?
Author(s) Beckmann, ChristaORCID iD for Beckmann, Christa orcid.org/0000-0002-7904-7228
Shine, Richard
Journal name Emu
Volume number 112
Issue number 2
Start page 83
End page 89
Total pages 7
Publisher The Union
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2012-04
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Keyword(s) alien species
Bufo marinus
chick
ecological impact
egg
invasive species
Summary Cane Toads (Rhinella marina; hereafter 'toads') are large, toxic American anurans that were introduced to Australia in 1935. Research on their ecological impact has focussed on the lethal ingestion of toxic toads by native frog-eating predators. Less attention has been paid to the potential impacts of Cane Toads as predators, although these large anurans sometimes eat vertebrates, such as nestling birds and bird eggs. We review published and unpublished data on interactions between Cane Toads and Australian ground-nesting birds, and collate distributional and breeding information to identify the avian taxa potentially at risk of having eggs or chicks eaten by Cane Toads. Cane Toads are currently sympatric with 80 ground-nesting bird species in Australia, and five additional species of bird occur within the predicted future range of the toad. Although many species of bird are potentially at risk, available data suggest there is minimal impact of Cane Toads on ground-nesting species. Future research could usefully address both direct and indirect impacts of the invasion by Cane Toads, ideally with detailed field observations of these impacts on nesting success and of changes in bird breeding success as a function of invasion by toads.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MU11028
Field of Research 050103 Invasive Species Ecology
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BirdLife Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046913

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 153 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2012, 12:49:41 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.