Biennial reproductive cycle in an extensive matrotrophic viviparous batoid : the sandyback stingaree Urolophus bucculentus from south-eastern Australia

Trinnie, F. I., Walker, T. I., Jones, P. L. and Laurenson, L. J. 2012, Biennial reproductive cycle in an extensive matrotrophic viviparous batoid : the sandyback stingaree Urolophus bucculentus from south-eastern Australia, Journal of fish biology, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 1267-1291.

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Title Biennial reproductive cycle in an extensive matrotrophic viviparous batoid : the sandyback stingaree Urolophus bucculentus from south-eastern Australia
Formatted title Biennial reproductive cycle in an extensive matrotrophic viviparous batoid : the sandyback stingaree Urolophus bucculentus from south-eastern Australia
Author(s) Trinnie, F. I.
Walker, T. I.
Jones, P. L.
Laurenson, L. J.
Journal name Journal of fish biology
Volume number 80
Issue number 5
Start page 1267
End page 1291
Total pages 25
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-04
ISSN 0022-1112
1095-8649
Keyword(s) gestation
maternity
maturity
ovulation
Summary Urolophus bucculentus, the largest urolophid species found in southern Australia, exhibits a biennial reproductive cycle. Ovulation occurs during October to January followed by a 15–19 month period of gestation followed by parturition during April to May and a short rest period while the ovarian follicles continue to develop for subsequent ovulation. Male breeding condition peaks during April to June to coincide with the period of parturition. Urolophus bucculentus has the highest matrotrophic contribution reported for any urolophid species, with a mean wet mass gain from egg in utero (4 g) to full-term embryo in utero (250 g) of c. 6250% (maximum c. 7200%), and perhaps explains the biennial female reproductive cycle where 50% of females contribute to each year's recruitment. Litter size (one to five) increases with total length (LT). Females reach a longer maximum LT (LTmax) than do males (885 v. 660 mm). The LT at maturity for males and females at 50% mature (LT50) is c. 414 mm (63% of LTmax) for males and c. 502 mm (57% of LTmax) for females, length at maternity indicates that recruitment production occurs later in life at c. 632 mm LT (71% of LTmax).
Language eng
Field of Research 070402 Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 960807 Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046965

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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