Openly accessible

Experimental quantification of long distance dispersal potential of aquatic snails in the gut of migratory birds

van Leeuwen, Casper H. A., van der Velde, Gerard, van Lith, Bart and Klaassen, Marcel 2012, Experimental quantification of long distance dispersal potential of aquatic snails in the gut of migratory birds, PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 3, Article number e32292, pp. 1-7.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
klaassen-experimentalquantification-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 208.33KB 27

Title Experimental quantification of long distance dispersal potential of aquatic snails in the gut of migratory birds
Author(s) van Leeuwen, Casper H. A.
van der Velde, Gerard
van Lith, Bart
Klaassen, Marcel
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 7
Issue number 3
Season Article number e32292
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-03-05
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) fresh-water invertebrates
south-west spain
potamopyrgus-antipodarum
digestive-system
captive killdeer
seed dispersal
retention time
mallard ducks
trade-offs
organisms
Summary Many plant seeds and invertebrates can survive passage through the digestive system of birds, which may lead to long distance dispersal (endozoochory) in case of prolonged retention by moving vectors. Endozoochorous dispersal by waterbirds has nowadays been documented for many aquatic plant seeds, algae and dormant life stages of aquatic invertebrates. Anecdotal information indicates that endozoochory is also possible for fully functional, active aquatic organisms, a phenomenon that we here address experimentally using aquatic snails. We fed four species of aquatic snails to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and monitored snail retrieval and survival over time. One of the snail species tested was found to survive passage through the digestive tract of mallards as fully functional adults. Hydrobia (Peringia) ulvae survived up to five hours in the digestive tract. This suggests a maximum potential transport distance of up to 300 km may be possible if these snails are taken by flying birds, although the actual dispersal distance greatly depends on additional factors such as the behavior of the vectors. We put forward that more organisms that acquired traits for survival in stochastic environments such as wetlands, but not specifically adapted for endozoochory, may be sufficiently equipped to successfully pass a bird's digestive system. This may be explained by a digestive trade-off in birds, which maximize their net energy intake rate rather than digestive efficiency, since higher efficiency comes with the cost of prolonged retention times and hence reduces food intake. The resulting lower digestive efficiency allows species like aquatic snails, and potentially other fully functional organisms without obvious dispersal adaptations, to be transported internally. Adopting this view, endozoochorous dispersal may be more common than up to now thought.
Notes This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, van Leeuwen et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046970

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 19 Abstract Views, 28 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2012, 12:55:35 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.