Openly accessible

Vector activity and propagule size affect dispersal potential by vertebrates

van Leeuwen, Casper H. A., Tollenaar, Marthe L. and Klaassen, Marcel 2012, Vector activity and propagule size affect dispersal potential by vertebrates, Oecologia, vol. 170, no. 1, pp. 101-109.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
klaassen-vectoractivity-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 340.15KB 9

Title Vector activity and propagule size affect dispersal potential by vertebrates
Author(s) van Leeuwen, Casper H. A.
Tollenaar, Marthe L.
Klaassen, Marcel
Journal name Oecologia
Volume number 170
Issue number 1
Start page 101
End page 109
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publication date 2012-09
ISSN 0029-8549
1432-1939
Keyword(s) digestion
endozoochory
metabolic rate
physiology
retention time
Summary Many small organisms in various life stages can be transported in the digestive system of larger vertebrates, a process known as endozoochory. Potential dispersal distances of these “propagules” are generally calculated after monitoring retrieval in experiments with resting vector animals. We argue that vectors in natural situations will be actively moving during effective transport rather than resting. We here test for the first time how physical activity of a vector animal might affect its dispersal efficiency. We compared digestive characteristics between swimming, wading (i.e. resting in water) and isolation (i.e. resting in a cage) mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). We fed plastic markers and aquatic gastropods, and monitored retrieval and survival of these propagules in the droppings over 24 h. Over a period of 5 h of swimming, mallards excreted 1.5 times more markers than when wading and 2.3 times more markers than isolation birds, the pattern being reversed over the subsequent period of monitoring where all birds were resting. Retention times of markers were shortened for approximately 1 h for swimming, and 0.5 h for wading birds. Shorter retention times imply higher survival of propagules at increased vector activity. However, digestive intensity measured directly by retrieval of snail shells was not a straightforward function of level of activity. Increased marker size had a negative effect on discharge rate. Our experiment indicates that previous estimates of propagule dispersal distances based on resting animals are overestimated, while propagule survival seems underestimated. These findings have implications for the dispersal of invasive species, meta-population structures and long distance colonization events.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046971

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 26 Abstract Views, 12 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2012, 12:55:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.