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Predicting landscape-genetic consequences of habitat loss, fragmentation and mobility for multiple species of woodland birds

Amos, J. Nevil, Bennett, Andrew F., MacNally, Ralph, Newell, Graeme, Pavlova, Alexandra, Radford, James Q., Thomson, James R., White, Matt and Sunnucks, Paul 2012, Predicting landscape-genetic consequences of habitat loss, fragmentation and mobility for multiple species of woodland birds, PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 2, Article number e30888, pp. 1-12.

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Title Predicting landscape-genetic consequences of habitat loss, fragmentation and mobility for multiple species of woodland birds
Author(s) Amos, J. Nevil
Bennett, Andrew F.
MacNally, Ralph
Newell, Graeme
Pavlova, Alexandra
Radford, James Q.
Thomson, James R.
White, Matt
Sunnucks, Paul
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Season Article number e30888
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-02-17
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) roe deer population
functional connectivity
extinction debt
southern australia
martes-americana
circuit-theory
flow
dispersal
distance
model
Summary Inference concerning the impact of habitat fragmentation on dispersal and gene flow is a key theme in landscape genetics. Recently, the ability of established approaches to identify reliably the differential effects of landscape structure (e.g. land-cover composition, remnant vegetation configuration and extent) on the mobility of organisms has been questioned. More explicit methods of predicting and testing for such effects must move beyond post hoc explanations for single landscapes and species. Here, we document a process for making a priori predictions, using existing spatial and ecological data and expert opinion, of the effects of landscape structure on genetic structure of multiple species across replicated landscape blocks. We compare the results of two common methods for estimating the influence of landscape structure on effective distance: least-cost path analysis and isolation-by-resistance. We present a series of alternative models of genetic connectivity in the study area, represented by different landscape resistance surfaces for calculating effective distance, and identify appropriate null models. The process is applied to ten species of sympatric woodland-dependant birds. For each species, we rank a priori the expectation of fit of genetic response to the models according to the expected response of birds to loss of structural connectivity and landscape-scale tree-cover. These rankings (our hypotheses) are presented for testing with empirical genetic data in a subsequent contribution. We propose that this replicated landscape, multi-species approach offers a robust method for identifying the likely effects of landscape fragmentation on dispersal.
Language eng
Field of Research 050104 Landscape Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Public Library of Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046978

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.