Introgression of domesticated alleles into a wild trout genotype and the impact on seasonal survival in natural lakes

Vandersteen, Wendy, Biro, Peter, Harris, Les and Devlin, Robert 2012, Introgression of domesticated alleles into a wild trout genotype and the impact on seasonal survival in natural lakes, Evolutionary applications, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 76-88.

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Title Introgression of domesticated alleles into a wild trout genotype and the impact on seasonal survival in natural lakes
Author(s) Vandersteen, Wendy
Biro, Peter
Harris, Les
Devlin, Robert
Journal name Evolutionary applications
Volume number 5
Issue number 1
Start page 76
End page 88
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Hoboken, N. J.
Publication date 2012-01
ISSN 1752-4563
1752-4571
Keyword(s) aquaculture
fisheries management
hybridization
phenotypic plasticity
predator prey interactions
Summary We tested the fitness consequences of introgression of fast-growing domesticated fish into a wild population. Fry from wild and domesticated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) crosses, F1 hybrids, and first- and second-generation backcrosses were released into two natural lakes. Parentage analysis using microsatellite loci facilitated the identification of survivors, so fitness was estimated in nature from the first-feeding stage. Results indicated that under certain conditions, domesticated fish survived at least as well as wild fish within the same environment. Relative growth and survival of the crosses, however, were highly dependent on environment. During the first summer, fastest-growing crosses had the highest survival, but this trend was reversed after one winter and another summer. Although the F1 hybrids showed evidence of outbreeding depression because of the disruption of local adaptation, there was little evidence of outbreeding depression in the backcrosses, and the second-generation backcrosses exhibited a wild-type phenotype. This information is relevant for assessing the multigenerational risk of escaped or released domesticated fish should they successfully interbreed with wild populations and provides information on how to minimize detrimental impacts of a conservation breeding and/or management programme. These data also further understanding of the selection pressures in nature that maintain submaximal rates of growth.
Language eng
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047009

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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