Openly accessible

From food to offspring down : tissue-specific discrimination and turn-over of stable isotopes in herbivorous waterbirds and other avian foraging guilds

Hahn, Steffen, Hoye, Bethany J., Korthals, Harry and Klaassen, Marcel 2012, From food to offspring down : tissue-specific discrimination and turn-over of stable isotopes in herbivorous waterbirds and other avian foraging guilds, PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 1-6.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hahn-fromfoodto-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 165.30KB 24

Title From food to offspring down : tissue-specific discrimination and turn-over of stable isotopes in herbivorous waterbirds and other avian foraging guilds
Author(s) Hahn, Steffen
Hoye, Bethany J.
Korthals, Harry
Klaassen, Marcel
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) body condition
nitrogen
carbon
diet
fractionation
feathers
habitat
delta-N-15
delta-C-13
signatures
Summary Isotopic discrimination and turn-over are fundamental to the application of stable isotope ecology in animals. However, detailed information for specific tissues and species are widely lacking, notably for herbivorous species. We provide details on tissue-specific carbon and nitrogen discrimination and turn-over times from food to blood, feathers, claws, egg tissues and offspring down feathers in four species of herbivorous waterbirds. Source-to-tissue discrimination factors for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ15N) showed little variation across species but varied between tissues. Apparent discrimination factors ranged between −0.5 to 2.5‰ for δ13C and 2.8 to 5.2‰ for δ15N, and were more similar between blood components than between keratinous tissues or egg tissue. Comparing these results with published data from other species we found no effect of foraging guild on discrimination factors for carbon but a significant foraging-guild effect for nitrogen discrimination factors.

Turn-over of δ13C in tissues was most rapid in blood plasma, with a half-life of 4.3 d, whereas δ13C in blood cells had a half-life of approximately 32 d. Turn-over times for albumen and yolk in laying females were similar to those of blood plasma, at 3.2 and 6.0 d respectively. Within yolk, we found decreasing half-life times of δ13C from inner yolk (13.3 d) to outer yolk (3.1 d), related to the temporal pattern of tissue formation.

We found similarities in tissue-specific turn-over times across all avian species studied to date. Yet, while generalities regarding discrimination factors and tissue turn-over times can be made, a large amount of variation remains unexplained.
Language eng
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047070

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views, 25 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2012, 13:12:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.