Systematics and palaeoecology of Changhsingian (Late Permian) Ambocoeliidae brachiopods from South China and implications for the end-Permian mass extinction

He, Weihong, Shi, G. R., Zhang, Yang, Yang, Tinglu, Teng, Fei and Wu, Shunbao 2012, Systematics and palaeoecology of Changhsingian (Late Permian) Ambocoeliidae brachiopods from South China and implications for the end-Permian mass extinction, Alcheringa, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 515-530.

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Title Systematics and palaeoecology of Changhsingian (Late Permian) Ambocoeliidae brachiopods from South China and implications for the end-Permian mass extinction
Author(s) He, Weihong
Shi, G. R.
Zhang, Yang
Yang, Tinglu
Teng, Fei
Wu, Shunbao
Journal name Alcheringa
Volume number 36
Issue number 4
Start page 515
End page 530
Total pages 16
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-08-02
ISSN 0311-5518
1752-0754
Keyword(s) ambocoeliidae
palaeoecology
South China
end-Permian mass extinction
deep-water faunas
Summary Four Ambocoeliidae brachiopod species including one new species (Crurithyris tazawai sp. nov., Crurithyris sp., Paracrurithyris pygmaea and Attenuatella mengi) are described from the Changhsingian (Late Permian) deep-water facies of South China. Analysis of the morphology, palaeoecology and palaeogeographical and temporal distributions of these species revealed that the presence of a delthyrium and/or the micro-ornaments among three of the four species (Crurithyris tazawai sp. nov., Paracrurithyris pygmaea and Attenuatella mengi) favoured an epifaunal (epiphytic) lifestyle. Morphological differences suggest that Paracrurithyris pygmaea may have been more effective metabolically in forming the shell compared with Attenuatella mengi and Crurithyris tazawai. The temporal and palaeogeographical distribution of Attenuatella suggests that A. mengi inhabited cool or cold deep waters. Both Crurithyris tazawai and Attenuatella mengi disappeared earlier in the stratigraphic record than Paracrurithyis pygmaea during the Permian–Triassic mass extinction. These differences in timing of extinction, morphology and palaeogeographical distributions suggest that oxygen deficiency and trophic resource limitation (a consequence of the changing composition of marine phytoplankton in the seas) may have contributed to the end-Permian mass extinction.
Language eng
Field of Research 060206 Palaeoecology
040308 Palaeontology (incl Palynology)
Socio Economic Objective 960305 Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Association of Australasian Palaeontologists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047077

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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