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Excess gestational weight gain : an exploration of midwives' views and practice.

Willcox, Jane C., Campbell, Karen J., van der Pligt, Paige, Hoban, Elizabeth, Pidd, Deborah and Wilkinson, Shelley 2012, Excess gestational weight gain : an exploration of midwives' views and practice., BMC pregnancy and childbirth, vol. 12, no. Article no. 102, pp. 1-11.

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Title Excess gestational weight gain : an exploration of midwives' views and practice.
Author(s) Willcox, Jane C.
Campbell, Karen J.
van der Pligt, Paige
Hoban, Elizabeth
Pidd, Deborah
Wilkinson, Shelley
Journal name BMC pregnancy and childbirth
Volume number 12
Issue number Article no. 102
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-09
ISSN 1471-2393
Keyword(s) Gestational weight gain
Qualitative research
Weight
Midwives
Pregnancy
Summary Background
Excess gestational weight gain (GWG) can affect the immediate and long term health outcomes of mother and infant. Understanding health providers' views, attitudes and practices around GWG is crucial to assist in the development of practical, time efficient and cost effective ways of supporting health providers to promote healthy GWGs. This study aimed to explore midwives' views, attitudes and approaches to the assessment, management and promotion of healthy GWG and to investigate their views on optimal interventions.
Methods
Midwives working in antenatal care were recruited from one rural and one urban Australian maternity hospital employing purposive sampling strategies to assess a range of practice areas. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 15 experienced midwives using an interview guide and all interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically.
Results
Midwives interviewed exhibited a range of views, attitudes and practices related to GWG. Three dominant themes emerged. Overall GWG was given low priority for midwives working in the antenatal care service in both hospitals. In addition, the midwives were deeply concerned for the physical and psychological health of pregnant women and worried about perceived negative impacts of discussion about weight and related interventions with women. Finally, the midwives saw themselves as central in providing lifestyle behaviour education to pregnant women and identified opportunities for support to promote healthy GWG.
Conclusions
The findings indicate that planning and implementation of healthy GWG interventions are likely to be challenging because the factors impacting on midwives' engagement in the GWG arena are varied and complex. This study provides insights for guideline and intervention development for the promotion of healthy GWG.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012 BioMed Central Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047174

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.