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Is maternal nutrition knowledge more strongly associated with the diets of mothers or their school-aged children?

Williams, Lauren, Campbell, Karen, Abbott, Gavin, Crawford, David and Ball, Kylie 2012, Is maternal nutrition knowledge more strongly associated with the diets of mothers or their school-aged children?, Public health nutrition, vol. 15, no. 8, pp. 1396-1401.

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Title Is maternal nutrition knowledge more strongly associated with the diets of mothers or their school-aged children?
Author(s) Williams, Lauren
Campbell, Karen
Abbott, Gavin
Crawford, David
Ball, Kylie
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 15
Issue number 8
Start page 1396
End page 1401
Total pages 6
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2012-08
ISSN 1368-9800
Keyword(s) maternal nutrition knowledge
child's diet
mother's diet
socio-economically disadvantaged women
Summary Objective Maternal nutrition knowledge has frequently been identified as an important target for nutrition promotion interventions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal nutrition knowledge is more strongly associated with the mother's own diet or that of her child.

Design Cross-sectional multivariate linear regression with interactions analyses of survey data.

Setting
Socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Victoria, Australia.

Subjects Five hundred and twenty-three mothers and their children who participated in the Resilience for Eating and Physical Activity Despite Inequality (READI) study, a cross-sectional survey study conducted in 2009 among women and their children residing in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Results In adjusted models, for three (vegetable, chocolate/lollies and soft drink consumption) out of the seven dietary outcomes assessed, there was a significant association between maternal nutrition knowledge and maternal diet, whereas for the children's diets none of the seven outcomes were associated with maternal nutrition knowledge. Statistical comparison of regression coefficients showed no difference between the maternal nutrition knowledge–maternal diet association and the maternal nutrition knowledge–child diet association.

Conclusions Promoting maternal nutrition knowledge may represent an important avenue for improving diet in mothers from socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods, but more information is needed on how and when this knowledge is translated to benefits for their children's diet.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047179

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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2012, 15:03:55 EST by Lily Meloni

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.