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The type II secretion system and its ubiquitous lipoprotein substrate, SsIE are required for biofilm formation and virulence of enteropathogenic escherichia coli

Baldi, Deborah L., Higginson, Ellen E., Hocking, Dianna M., Praszkier, Judyta, Cavaliere, Rosalia, James, Catherine E., Bennett-Wood, Vicki, Azzopardi, Kristy I., Turnbull, Lynne, Lithgow, Trevor, Robins-Browne, Roy M., Whitchurch, Cynthia B. and Tauschek, Marija 2012, The type II secretion system and its ubiquitous lipoprotein substrate, SsIE are required for biofilm formation and virulence of enteropathogenic escherichia coli, Infection and immunity, vol. 80, no. 6, pp. 2042-2052, doi: 10.1128/IAI.06160-11.

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Title The type II secretion system and its ubiquitous lipoprotein substrate, SsIE are required for biofilm formation and virulence of enteropathogenic escherichia coli
Author(s) Baldi, Deborah L.
Higginson, Ellen E.
Hocking, Dianna M.
Praszkier, Judyta
Cavaliere, Rosalia
James, Catherine E.
Bennett-Wood, Vicki
Azzopardi, Kristy I.
Turnbull, Lynne
Lithgow, Trevor
Robins-Browne, Roy M.
Whitchurch, Cynthia B.
Tauschek, Marija
Journal name Infection and immunity
Volume number 80
Issue number 6
Start page 2042
End page 2052
Total pages 11
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Place of publication Washington, D. C.
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 0019-9567
1098-5522
Keyword(s) animals
biofilms
cell membrane
enteropathogenic escherichia coli
escherichia coli proteins
gene expression regulation
bacterial
mutation
rabbits
substrate specificity
virulence
Summary Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in infants in developing countries. We have identified a functional type II secretion system (T2SS) in EPEC that is homologous to the pathway responsible for the secretion of heat-labile enterotoxin by enterotoxigenic E. coli. The wild-type EPEC T2SS was able to secrete a heat-labile enterotoxin reporter, but an isogenic T2SS mutant could not. We showed that the major substrate of the T2SS in EPEC is SslE, an outer membrane lipoprotein (formerly known as YghJ), and that a functional T2SS is essential for biofilm formation by EPEC. T2SS and SslE mutants were arrested at the microcolony stage of biofilm formation, suggesting that the T2SS is involved in the development of mature biofilms and that SslE is a dominant effector of biofilm development. Moreover, the T2SS was required for virulence, as infection of rabbits with a rabbit-specific EPEC strain carrying a mutation in either the T2SS or SslE resulted in significantly reduced intestinal colonization and milder disease.
Language eng
DOI 10.1128/IAI.06160-11
Field of Research 110801 Medical Bacteriology
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, American Society for Microbiology
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047263

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Created: Tue, 21 Aug 2012, 10:05:36 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.