Openly accessible

Advancing science by enhancing learning in the laboratory (ASELL)

Kable, Scott, Buntine, Mark, Yeung, Alexandra, Sharma, Manjula, Lim, Kieran, Pyke, Simon, Burke da Silva, Karen and Barrie, Simon 2012, Advancing science by enhancing learning in the laboratory (ASELL), Office of Learning and Teaching, Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Sydney, N. S. W..

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
lim-advancingscience-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.67MB 209

Title Advancing science by enhancing learning in the laboratory (ASELL)
Author(s) Kable, Scott
Buntine, Mark
Yeung, Alexandra
Sharma, Manjula
Lim, Kieran
Pyke, Simon
Burke da Silva, Karen
Barrie, Simon
Publication date 2012
Total pages 84
Publisher Office of Learning and Teaching, Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
Place of Publication Sydney, N. S. W.
Summary Final report of the the Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory (ASELL) project. 

Most researchers agree that the laboratory experience ranks as a significant factor that influences students’ attitudes to their science courses. Consequently, good laboratory programs should play a major role in influencing student learning and performance. The laboratory program can be pivotal in defining a student's experience in the sciences, and if done poorly, can be a major contributing factor in causing disengagement from the subject area. The challenge remains to provide students with laboratory activities that are relevant, engaging and offer effective learning opportunities.

The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory (ASELL) project has developed over the last 10 years with the aim of improving the quality of learning in undergraduate laboratories, providing a validated means of evaluating and improving the laboratory experience of students, and effective professional development for academic staff. After successful development in chemistry and trials using the developed principles in physics and biology, the project, with ALTC funding, has now expanded to include those disciplines.

The launching pad for ASELL was a multidisciplinary workshop held in Adelaide in April, 2010. This workshop involved 100 academics and students, plus 13 Deans of Science (or delegates), covering the three enabling sciences of biology, chemistry and physics. Thirty-nine undergraduate experiments were trialled over the three days of the workshop. More importantly, professional development in laboratory education was developed in the 42 academic staff that attended the workshop.

Following the workshop, delegates continued to evaluate, develop and improve both individual experiments and whole laboratory programs in their home institutions, mentored by the ASELL Team. Some highlights include:
- more than 15,000 student surveys carried out by delegates during 2010/11
- 10 whole lab programs were surveyed by delegates
- 4 new ASELL-style workshops, conducted by ASELL-trained delegates were run in 2010/11
- more than 100 ASELL-tested experiments available on the website (www.asell.org)
- ASELL workshops conducted in Philippines, Ireland in 2010, and planned in the USA and Thailand for 2011
- significant improvement in student evaluation of whole laboratory programs and individual experiments measured in universities using the ASELL approach
- high profile of ASELL activities in the Australian Council of Deans of Science (ACDS)
- research project on the misconceptions of academic staff about laboratory learning completed
- significant research on student learning in the laboratory, and staff perceptions of student learning have been carried out during 2010/11
- research results have been benchmarked against staff and students in the USA.

The biggest unresolved issue for ASELL is one of sustainability in the post-ALTC funding era. ASELL will make a series of recommendations to the ACDS, but the future of the program depends, to a large part, on how the ACDS responds.
Notes Support for the original work was provided by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Ltd, an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.
Language eng
Field of Research 130309 Learning Sciences
130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category A6 Research report/technical paper
Related work DU:30040763
DU:30041411
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047300

Connect to link resolver
 
Link to Related Work
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 216 Abstract Views, 209 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 22 Aug 2012, 17:21:09 EST by Kieran Lim

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.