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Nurses’ advice regarding sterile or clean urinary drainage bags for individuals with a long-term Indwelling urinary catheter

Ostaszkiewicz, Joan and Paterson, Jan 2012, Nurses’ advice regarding sterile or clean urinary drainage bags for individuals with a long-term Indwelling urinary catheter, Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 77-83, doi: 10.1097/WON.0b013e31823f2dbc.

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Title Nurses’ advice regarding sterile or clean urinary drainage bags for individuals with a long-term Indwelling urinary catheter
Author(s) Ostaszkiewicz, Joan
Paterson, Jan
Journal name Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing
Volume number 39
Issue number 1
Start page 77
End page 83
Total pages 7
Publisher 2-s2.0-84856049205
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2012-01
ISSN 1071-5754
1528-3976
Keyword(s) nursing homes
care
bacteriuria
community
decontamination
prevalence
facilities
mortality
tract-infections
Summary PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify, compare, and explore advice nurses give to community-dwelling long-term indwelling catheter users on the use of sterile or clean urinary drainage bags, and to obtain information that would inform the design of a larger-scale international survey.


SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS: A survey was targeted to nurse members of the International Continence Society (n = 130). Respondents (n = 28; 21.5%) included nurses from Australia, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, who specialized in managing incontinence.


METHODS: The project was conducted as a descriptive, exploratory pilot study. Respondents completed an online anonymous survey that was distributed by the International Continence Society. The survey instrument was designed by the investigators and comprised 14 questions with both fixed and open-ended response options.


RESULTS: Most respondents in this survey advised indwelling catheter users to reuse their catheter bags (n = 15; 68%). Factors that influenced advice included concerns about the cost of catheter bags, an evaluation of the individual's infection risk, local and national policies, evidence-based guidelines, users' living arrangements, and their ability to clean the bags. Advice on decontamination methods varied; however, the most commonly recommended cleaning agent was water and vinegar, followed by a sterilizing or bleach solution or dishwashing detergent.


CONCLUSION:
Nurses play a key role in educating and supporting indwelling catheter users. Results of this study highlight variability in the advice nurses give to community-dwelling long-term indwelling catheter users about sterile or clean urinary drainage bags. This variability requires further investigation and affirms the need for a larger-scale study that draws on a broader sample of nurses.

Language eng
DOI 10.1097/WON.0b013e31823f2dbc
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047313

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2012, 13:33:50 EST by Jane Moschetti

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