Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments phagocytosis of mycobacterium avium complex by human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes/macrophages in vitro and in vivo

Kedzierska, Katherine, Mak, Johnson, Mijch, Anne, Cooke, Ian, Rainbird, Melissa, Roberts, Sally, Paukovics, Geza, Jolley, Damien, Lopez, Angel and Crowe, Suzanne M. 2000, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments phagocytosis of mycobacterium avium complex by human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes/macrophages in vitro and in vivo, Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 181, no. 1, pp. 390-394.

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Title Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments phagocytosis of mycobacterium avium complex by human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes/macrophages in vitro and in vivo
Author(s) Kedzierska, Katherine
Mak, Johnson
Mijch, Anne
Cooke, Ian
Rainbird, Melissa
Roberts, Sally
Paukovics, Geza
Jolley, Damien
Lopez, Angel
Crowe, Suzanne M.
Journal name Journal of infectious diseases
Volume number 181
Issue number 1
Start page 390
End page 394
Total pages 5
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Cary, N. C.
Publication date 2000
ISSN 0022-1899
1537-6613
Keyword(s) cultured cells
granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor
HIV infections
HIV-1
macrophages
monocytes
mycobacterium avium complex
mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection
phagocytosis
Summary The role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection on the ability of human monocytes/macrophages to phagocytose Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in vivo and in vitro and the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on this function were investigated. By use of a flow cytometric assay to quantify phagocytosis, HIV-1 infection was found to impair the ability of monocyte-derived macrophages to phagocytose MAC in vitro, whereas GM-CSF significantly improved this defect. Phagocytosis was not altered by exposure to a mutant form of GM-CSF (E21R) binding only to the α chain of the GM-CSF receptor, suggesting that signaling by GM-CSF that leads to augmentation of phagocytosis is via the β chain of the receptor. In a patient with AIDS and disseminated multidrug-resistant MAC infection, GM-CSF treatment improved phagocytosis of MAC by peripheral blood monocytes and reduced bacteremia. These results imply that GM-CSF therapy may be useful in restoring antimycobacterial function by human monocytes/macrophages.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2000, Oxford University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047514

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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