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Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 in depression is not a viable therapeutic approach and may even aggravate the pathophysiology underpinning depression

Maes, Michael 2012, Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 in depression is not a viable therapeutic approach and may even aggravate the pathophysiology underpinning depression, Metabolic brain disease, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 405-413, doi: 10.1007/s11011-012-9326-6.

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Title Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 in depression is not a viable therapeutic approach and may even aggravate the pathophysiology underpinning depression
Author(s) Maes, Michael
Journal name Metabolic brain disease
Volume number 27
Issue number 4
Start page 405
End page 413
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2012-12
ISSN 0885-7490
1573-7365
Keyword(s) depression
cytokines
inflammation
COX-2
cardiovascular disorder
leaky gut
oxidative and nitrosative stress
Summary Depression is a complex progressive disorder accompanied by activation of inflammatory and Th-1 driven pathways, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), lowered antioxidant levels, mitochondrial dysfunctions, neuroprogression and increased bacterial translocation. In depression, activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways is associated with an increased risk for cardio-vascular disorder (CVD). Because of the inflammatory component, the use of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors, such as celecoxib, has been advocated to treat depression. Electronic databases, i.e. PUBMED, Scopus and Google Scholar were used as sources for this selective review on the effects of COX-2 inhibitors aggravating the abovementioned pathways. COX-2 inhibitors may induce neuroinflammation, exacerbate Th1 driven responses, increase lipid peroxidation, decrease the levels of key antioxidants, damage mitochondria and aggravate neuroprogression. COX-2 inhibitors may aggravate bacterial translocation and CVD through Th1-driven mechanisms. COX-2 inhibitors may aggravate the pathophysiology of depression. Since Th1 and O&NS pathways are risk factors for CVD, the use of COX-2 inhibitors may further aggravate the increased risk for CVD in depression. Selectively targeting COX-2 may not be a viable therapeutic approach to treat depression. Multi-targeting of the different pathways that play a role in depression is more likely to yield good treatment results.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11011-012-9326-6
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047547

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 25 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 27 times in Scopus
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Created: Thu, 30 Aug 2012, 09:41:48 EST

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