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Dietary intake of fish and PUFA, and clinical depressive and anxiety disorders in women

Jacka, Felice N., Pasco, Julie A., Williams, Lana J., Meyer, Barbara J., Digger, Rebecca and Berk, Michael 2013, Dietary intake of fish and PUFA, and clinical depressive and anxiety disorders in women, British journal of nutrition, vol. 109, no. 11, pp. 2059-2066.

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Title Dietary intake of fish and PUFA, and clinical depressive and anxiety disorders in women
Author(s) Jacka, Felice N.
Pasco, Julie A.
Williams, Lana J.
Meyer, Barbara J.
Digger, Rebecca
Berk, Michael
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 109
Issue number 11
Start page 2059
End page 2066
Total pages 8
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2013-06
ISSN 1475-2662
0007-1145
Keyword(s) n-3
n-6
PUFA
depression
anxiety
diet
nutrition
Summary Fish and PUFA consumption are thought to play a role in mental health; however, many studies do not take into account multiple sources of PUFA. The present study analysed data from a sample of 935 randomly selected, population-based women aged 20–93 years. A validated and comprehensive dietary questionnaire ascertained the consumption of n-3 and n-6 PUFA. Another assessed fish and energy intake and provided data for a dietary quality score. The General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) measured psychological symptoms and a clinical interview (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Research Version, Non-patient edition) assessed depressive and anxiety disorders. Median dietary intakes of long-chain n-3 fatty acids (310 mg/d) were below suggested dietary target levels. The only PUFA related to categorical depressive and anxiety disorders was DHA. There was a non-linear relationship between DHA intake and depression; those in the second tertile of DHA intake were nearly 70 % less likely to report a current depressive disorder compared to those in the first tertile. The relationship of DHA to anxiety disorders was linear; for those in the highest tertile of DHA intake, the odds for anxiety disorders were reduced by nearly 50 % after adjustments, including adjustment for diet quality scores, compared to the lowest tertile. Those who ate fish less than once per week had higher GHQ-12 scores, and this relationship was particularly obvious in smokers. These are the first observational data to indicate a role for DHA in anxiety disorders, but suggest that the relationship between DHA and depressive disorders may be non-linear.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047612

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.