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Depression as a predictor of work resumption following myocardial infarction (MI): a review of recent research evidence

O'Neil, Adrienne, Sanderson, Kristy and Oldenburg, Brian 2010, Depression as a predictor of work resumption following myocardial infarction (MI): a review of recent research evidence, Health and quality of life outcomes, vol. 8, Article number: 95, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/1477-7525-8-95.

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Title Depression as a predictor of work resumption following myocardial infarction (MI): a review of recent research evidence
Author(s) O'Neil, Adrienne
Sanderson, Kristy
Oldenburg, Brian
Journal name Health and quality of life outcomes
Volume number 8
Season Article number: 95
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010-09-06
ISSN 1477-7525
Keyword(s) absenteeism
acute coronary syndrome
cardiovascular disease
CINAHL
convalescence
coronary artery disease
depression
disease association
disease severity
Summary Background Depression often coexists with myocardial infarction (MI) and has been found to impede recovery through reduced functioning in key areas of life such as work. In an era of improved survival rates and extended working lives, we review whether depression remains a predictor of poorer work outcomes following MI by systematically reviewing literature from the past 15 years.

Methods Articles were identified using medical, health, occupational and social science databases, including PubMed, OVID, Medline, Proquest, CINAHL plus, CCOHS, SCOPUS, Web of Knowledge, and the following pre-determined criteria were applied: (i) collection of depression measures (as distinct from 'psychological distress') and work status at baseline, (ii) examination and statistical analysis of predictors of work outcomes, (iii) inclusion of cohorts with patients exhibiting symptoms consistent with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), (iv) follow-up of work-specific and depression specific outcomes at minimum 6 months, (v) published in English over the past 15 years. Results from included articles were then evaluated for quality and analysed by comparing effect size.

Results Of the 12 articles meeting criteria, depression significantly predicted reduced likelihood of return to work (RTW) in the majority of studies (n = 7). Further, there was a trend suggesting that increased depression severity was associated with poorer RTW outcomes 6 to 12 months after a cardiac event. Other common significant predictors of RTW were age and patient perceptions of their illness and work performance.

Conclusion Depression is a predictor of work resumption post-MI. As work is a major component of Quality of Life (QOL), this finding has clinical, social, public health and economic implications in the modern era. Targeted depression interventions could facilitate RTW post-MI.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-8-95
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047641

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.