Children's consumption of energy dense nutrient poor foods, fruit and vegetables; are they related? An analysis of data from a cross sectional survey

Innes-Hughes, Christine, Hardy, Louise L., Venugopal, Kamalesh, King, Lesley A., Wolfenden, Luke and Rangan, Anna 2011, Children's consumption of energy dense nutrient poor foods, fruit and vegetables; are they related? An analysis of data from a cross sectional survey, Health promotion journal of Australia, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 210-216.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Children's consumption of energy dense nutrient poor foods, fruit and vegetables; are they related? An analysis of data from a cross sectional survey
Author(s) Innes-Hughes, Christine
Hardy, Louise L.
Venugopal, Kamalesh
King, Lesley A.
Wolfenden, Luke
Rangan, Anna
Journal name Health promotion journal of Australia
Volume number 22
Issue number 3
Start page 210
End page 216
Total pages 7
Publisher Australian Health Promotion Association
Place of publication Camperdown, N. S. W.
Publication date 2011-12
ISSN 1036-1073
Keyword(s) children
diet
extra foods
fruit
vegetables
Summary Issue addressed: Many children consume excessive amounts of energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) or 'extra' foods and low intakes of fruit and vegetables. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between EDNP foods and ascertain whether certain EDNP foods and beverages are more likely to be eaten in association with other EDNP foods.

Methods: A cross-sectional representative population survey of children in preschool (n=764), and of school students in Years K, 2 and 4 (n=1,560) and in Years 6, 8 and 10 (n=1,685) residing in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Dietary data were collected using a short food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models examined the association between EDNP foods and fruit and vegetable intake. Data were stratified by sex and age cohort.

Results: More frequent consumption of some EDNP food types was significantly associated with more frequent consumption of other EDNP foods. Fast food and soft drinks consumption were associated with each other as well as with fried potato and salty snacks; and with lower intakes of fruit and vegetables in some but not all age groups.

Conclusion: The positive associations found between EDNP foods point towards the existence of a high-risk group of children who frequently consume a variety of EDNP foods and drinks.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047644

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 30 Aug 2012, 09:52:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.