Mitochondrial DNA analysis of field populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) and of its relationship to H. zea

Behere, Gajanan T., Tay, Wee Tek, Russell, Derek A., Heckel, David G., Appleton, Belinda R., Kranthi, Keshav R. and Batterham, Philip 2007, Mitochondrial DNA analysis of field populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) and of its relationship to H. zea, BMC evolutionary biology, vol. 7, no. 117.

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Title Mitochondrial DNA analysis of field populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) and of its relationship to H. zea
Author(s) Behere, Gajanan T.
Tay, Wee Tek
Russell, Derek A.
Heckel, David G.
Appleton, Belinda R.
Kranthi, Keshav R.
Batterham, Philip
Journal name BMC evolutionary biology
Volume number 7
Issue number 117
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1471-2148
Keyword(s) analysis of variance
animals
base Sequence
DNA primers
mitochondrial DNA
insect genes
haplotypes
lepidoptera
molecular sequence data
moths
phylogeny
polymerase chain reaction
DNA sequence analysis
Summary Background
Helicoverpa armigera and H. zea are amongst the most significant polyphagous pest lepidopteran species in the Old and New Worlds respectively. Separation of H. armigera and H. zea is difficult and is usually only achieved through morphological differences in the genitalia. They are capable of interbreeding to produce fertile offspring. The single species status of H. armigera has been doubted, due to its wide distribution and plant host range across the Old World. This study explores the global genetic diversity of H. armigera and its evolutionary relationship to H zea.

Results
We obtained partial (511 bp) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Cytochrome Oxidase-I (COI) sequences for 249 individuals of H. armigera sampled from Australia, Burkina Faso, Uganda, China, India and Pakistan which were associated with various host plants. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the partial COI gene differentiated H. armigera populations into 33 mtDNA haplotypes. Shared haplotypes between continents, low F-statistic values and low nucleotide diversity between countries (0.0017 – 0.0038) suggests high mobility in this pest. Phylogenetic analysis of four major Helicoverpa pest species indicates that H. punctigera is basal to H. assulta, which is in turn basal to H. armigera and H. zea. Samples from North and South America suggest that H. zea is also a single species across its distribution. Our data reveal short genetic distances between H. armigera and H. zea which seem to have been established via a founder event from H. armigera stock at around 1.5 million years ago.

Conclusion
Our mitochondrial DNA sequence data supports the single species status of H. armigera across Africa, Asia and Australia. The evidence for inter-continental gene flow observed in this study is consistent with published evidence of the capacity of this species to migrate over long distances. The finding of high genetic similarity between Old World H. armigera and New World H. zea emphasises the need to consider work on both pests when building pest management strategies for either.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Behere et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047762

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
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