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Invasive species can't cover their tracks : using microsatellites to assist management of starling (Sturnus vulgaris) populations in Western Australia

Rollins, Lee Ann, Woolnough, Andrew P., Wilton, Alan N., Sinclair, Ron and Sherwin, William B. 2009, Invasive species can't cover their tracks : using microsatellites to assist management of starling (Sturnus vulgaris) populations in Western Australia, Molecular ecology, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 1560-1573, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04132.x.

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Title Invasive species can't cover their tracks : using microsatellites to assist management of starling (Sturnus vulgaris) populations in Western Australia
Author(s) Rollins, Lee AnnORCID iD for Rollins, Lee Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Woolnough, Andrew P.
Wilton, Alan N.
Sinclair, Ron
Sherwin, William B.
Journal name Molecular ecology
Volume number 18
Issue number 8
Start page 1560
End page 1573
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2009-04
ISSN 0962-1083
1365-294X
Keyword(s) assignment programmes
invasive species
microsatellites
museum samples
sturnus vulgaris
Summary Invasive species are known to cause environmental and economic damage, requiring management by control agencies worldwide. These species often become well established in new environments long before their detection, resulting in a lack of knowledge regarding their history and dynamics. When new invasions are discovered, information regarding the source and pathway of the invasion, and the degree of connectivity with other populations can greatly benefit management strategies. Here we use invasive common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) populations from Australia to demonstrate that genetic techniques can provide this information to aid management, even when applied to highly vagile species over continental scales. Analysis of data from 11 microsatellites in 662 individuals sampled at 17 localities across their introduced range in Australia revealed four populations. One population consisted of all sampling sites from the expansion front in Western Australia, where control efforts are focused. Despite evidence of genetic exchange over both contemporary and historical timescales, gene flow is low between this population and all three more easterly populations. This suggests that localized control of starlings on the expansion front may be an achievable goal and the long-standing practice of targeting select proximal eastern source populations may be ineffective on its own. However, even with low levels of gene flow, successful control of starlings on the expansion front will require vigilance, and genetic monitoring of this population can provide essential information to managers. The techniques used here are broadly applicable to invasive populations worldwide.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04132.x
Field of Research 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047883

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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