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Hemoglobin genotype has minimal influence on the physiological response of juvenile atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to environmental challenges

Gamperl, A. K., Busby, C. D., Hori, T. S. F., Afonso, L. O. B. and Hall, J. R. 2009, Hemoglobin genotype has minimal influence on the physiological response of juvenile atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to environmental challenges, Physiological and biochemical zoology, vol. 82, no. 5, pp. 483-494, doi: 10.1086/603636.

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Title Hemoglobin genotype has minimal influence on the physiological response of juvenile atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to environmental challenges
Author(s) Gamperl, A. K.
Busby, C. D.
Hori, T. S. F.
Afonso, L. O. B.
Hall, J. R.
Journal name Physiological and biochemical zoology
Volume number 82
Issue number 5
Start page 483
End page 494
Total pages 12
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2009-09
ISSN 1522-2152
1537-5293
Keyword(s) biogeography
blood
environmental factor
gadoid
genotype
growth rate
hemoglobin
hypoxia
juvenile
physiological response
polymorphism
Summary Hemoglobin (Hb) polymorphism in cod is associated with temperature‐related differences in biogeographical distribution, and several authors have suggested that functional characteristics of the various hemoglobin isoforms (HbIs) directly influence phenotypic traits such as growth rate. However, no study has directly examined whether Hb genotype translates into physiological differences at the whole animal level. Thus, we generated a family of juvenile Atlantic cod consisting of all three main Hb genotypes (HbI‐1/1, HbI‐2/2, and HbI‐1/2) by crossing a single pair of heterozygous parents, and we compared their metabolic and cortisol responses to an acute thermal challenge (10°C to their critical thermal maximum [CTM] or 22°C, respectively) and tolerance of graded hypoxia. There were no differences in routine metabolism (at 10°C), maximum metabolic rate, metabolic scope, CTM (overall mean 22.9° ± 0.2°C), or resting and poststress plasma cortisol levels among Hb genotypes. Further, although the HbI‐1/1 fish grew more (by 15%–30% during the first 9 mo) when reared at 10° ± 1°C and had a slightly enhanced hypoxia tolerance at 10°C (e.g., the critical O2 levels for HbI‐1/1, HbI‐2/2, and HbI‐1/2 cod were 35.56% ± 1.24%, and 40.20% ± 1.99% air saturation, respectively), these results are contradictory to expectations based on HbI functional properties. Thus, our findings (1) do not support previous assumptions that growth rate differences among cod Hb genotypes result from a more efficient use of the oxygen supply—that is, reduced standard metabolic rates and/or increased metabolic capacity—and (2) suggest that in juvenile cod, there is no selective advantage to having a particular Hb genotype with regards to the capacity to withstand ecologically relevant environmental challenges.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/603636
Field of Research 070401 Aquaculture
070405 Fish Physiology and Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 830102 Aquaculture Fin Fish (excl. Tuna)
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The University of Chicago
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047900

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.