The use of molecular and morphological characters to resolve the taxonomic identity of cryptic species : the case of Miniopterus manavi (Chiroptera, Miniopteridae)

Goodman, Steven M., Maminirina, Claudette P., Weyeneth, Nicole, Bradman, Helen M., Christidis, Les, Ruedi, Manuel and Appleton, Belinda 2009, The use of molecular and morphological characters to resolve the taxonomic identity of cryptic species : the case of Miniopterus manavi (Chiroptera, Miniopteridae), Zoologica scripta, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 339-363.

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Title The use of molecular and morphological characters to resolve the taxonomic identity of cryptic species : the case of Miniopterus manavi (Chiroptera, Miniopteridae)
Author(s) Goodman, Steven M.
Maminirina, Claudette P.
Weyeneth, Nicole
Bradman, Helen M.
Christidis, Les
Ruedi, Manuel
Appleton, Belinda
Journal name Zoologica scripta
Volume number 38
Issue number 4
Start page 339
End page 363
Total pages 25
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2009-07
ISSN 0300-3256
1463-6409
Keyword(s) animalia
chiroptera
miniopterus
miniopterus manavi
Summary Based on recent molecular phylogenetic studies, the Old World bat family Miniopteridae, composed of species in the genus Miniopterus, has been shown to contain complex paraphyletic species, many of which are cryptic based on convergent morphological characters. Herein we resolve the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy of the species complex M. manavi on Madagascar and in the Comoro Archipelago, where these animals occur in different bioclimatic zones. First using mitochondrial cytochrome-b sequence data to define clades and then morphology to corroborate the molecular data, including comparisons to type specimens, we demonstrate that animals identified as this taxon are a minimum of three species: M. manavi sensu stricto occurs in at least the central portion of the Central Highlands; M. griveaudi has a broad distribution in lowland northern and central western Madagascar and the Comoros (Anjouan and Grande Comore), and M. aelleni sp. n. has been found in northern and western Madagascar and the Comoros (Anjouan). In each case, these three clades were genetically divergent and monophyletic and the taxa are diagnosable based on different external and craniodental characters. One aspect that helped to define the systematics of this group was isolation of DNA from one of the paratypes of M. manavi collected in 1896 and new topotypic material. Miniopterus manavi is most closely allied to a recently described species, M. petersoni. At several localities, M. griveaudi and M. aelleni have been found in strict sympatry, and together with M. manavi sensu stricto show considerable convergence in morphological characters, but are not immediate sister taxa. In defining and resolving the systematics of cryptic species, such as miniopterid bats, the process of defining clades with molecular tools, segregating the specimens accordingly, and identifying corroborative morphological characters has been notably efficient.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047943

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
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