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Sex-related differences in the organismal and cellular stress response in juvenile salmon exposed to treated bleached kraft mill effluent

Afonso, L. O. B., Basu, N., Nakano, K., Devlin, R. H. and Iwama, G. K. 2003, Sex-related differences in the organismal and cellular stress response in juvenile salmon exposed to treated bleached kraft mill effluent, Fish physiology and biochemistry, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 173-179, doi: 10.1023/B:FISH.0000035939.81588.09.

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Title Sex-related differences in the organismal and cellular stress response in juvenile salmon exposed to treated bleached kraft mill effluent
Author(s) Afonso, L. O. B.
Basu, N.
Nakano, K.
Devlin, R. H.
Iwama, G. K.
Journal name Fish physiology and biochemistry
Volume number 29
Issue number 2
Start page 173
End page 179
Total pages 7
Publisher Kluwer Academic Publishers
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2003-03
ISSN 0920-1742
1573-5168
Keyword(s) BKME
Cortisol
Environmental pollutants
hsp70
Sex differences
Stress response
Summary Exposure of fish to stressors can elicit biochemical and organismal changes at multiple levels of biological organization collectively known as stress responses. The organismal (plasma glucose and cortisol levels) and cellular (hepatic hsp70) stress responses in fish have been studied in several species, but little is known about sex-related differences in these responses. In this study, we exposed sexually immature juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to bleached kraft mill effluent (BKME: 0%, 1%, and 10% v/v) for 30 days and then measured components of their organismal and cellular stress responses. Males exposed to 1% BKME had higher levels of plasma glucose than females. Plasma cortisol levels were unaffected in females exposed to BKME, but males exposed to 10% BKME had significantly higher levels of plasma cortisol relative to non-exposed males. While exposure to BKME did not affect hsp70 levels in males, females exposed to 1% BKME had higher levels of hsp70 relative to non-exposed and 10% BKME groups. Within any given treatment, females had higher levels of hsp70 relative to males. This study demonstrates that sex-related differences exist in commonly used indicators of stress in fish, and points out the importance of considering the sex of the fish in stress research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1023/B:FISH.0000035939.81588.09
Field of Research 070401 Aquaculture
070405 Fish Physiology and Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 830102 Aquaculture Fin Fish (excl. Tuna)
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Kluwer Academic Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047945

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