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Behavioural trade-offs between growth and mortality explain evolution of submaximal growth rates

Biro, Peter A., Abrahams, Mark V., Post, John R. and Parkinson, Eric A. 2006, Behavioural trade-offs between growth and mortality explain evolution of submaximal growth rates, Journal of animal ecology, vol. 75, no. 5, pp. 1165-1171, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01137.x.

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Title Behavioural trade-offs between growth and mortality explain evolution of submaximal growth rates
Author(s) Biro, Peter A.ORCID iD for Biro, Peter A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3565-240X
Abrahams, Mark V.
Post, John R.
Parkinson, Eric A.
Journal name Journal of animal ecology
Volume number 75
Issue number 5
Start page 1165
End page 1171
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2006-09
ISSN 0021-8790
1365-2656
Keyword(s) activity
antipredator
genotype
habitat use
trout
Summary 1. The importance of body size and growth rate in ecological interactions is widely recognized, and both are frequently used as surrogates for fitness. However, if there are significant costs associated with rapid growth rates then its fitness benefits may be questioned.

2. In replicated whole-lake experiments, we show that a domestic strain of rainbow trout (artificially selected for maximum intrinsic growth rate) use productive but risky habitats more than wild trout. Consequently, domestic trout grow faster in all situations, experience greater survival in the absence of predators, but have lower survival in the presence of predators. Therefore, rapid growth rates are selected against due to increased foraging effort (or conversely, lower antipredator behaviour) that increases vulnerability to predators. In other words, there is a behaviourally mediated trade-off between growth and mortality rates.

3. Whereas rapid growth is beneficial in many ecological interactions, our results show the mortality costs of achieving it are large in the presence of predators, which can help explain the absence of an average phenotype with maximized growth rates in nature.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01137.x
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060801 Animal Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047973

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