The central-place territorial model does not apply to space-use by juvenile brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis in lakes

Biro, Peter A., Ridgway, Mark S. and Noakes, David L. G. 1997, The central-place territorial model does not apply to space-use by juvenile brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis in lakes, Journal of animal ecology, vol. 66, no. 6, pp. 837-845.

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Title The central-place territorial model does not apply to space-use by juvenile brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis in lakes
Formatted title The central-place territorial model does not apply to space-use by juvenile brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis in lakes
Author(s) Biro, Peter A.
Ridgway, Mark S.
Noakes, David L. G.
Journal name Journal of animal ecology
Volume number 66
Issue number 6
Start page 837
End page 845
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 1997-11
ISSN 0021-8790
1365-2656
Keyword(s) behaviour
lentic
population regulation
salmonidae
Summary 1. Territoriality is widely accepted as the mechanism responsible for density-dependent mortality, emigration, and 'self-thinning' of populations of juvenile salmonine fishes in streams. Numerous studies have focused on territoriality exclusively in stream (lotic) environments and thus have fostered a stereotyped view of juvenile salmonines as sedentary and territorial. We term this behavioural paradigm the central-place territorial model (CPTM).

2. We tested predictions characterizing the CPTM for young-of-the-year (YOY) brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) in two Canadian lakes to determine if territoriality may also potentially limit space and population size of brook charr in lakes.

3. Our findings were not consistent with the CPTM. Fish in both lakes were not central-place forages. Maximum displacement distance did not increase with body length as predicted by the general salmonine model of Grant and Kramer (1990). Net displacement distanced increased with the proportion of time spent moving. Aggressive frequency was greatest for fish which spent large proportions of time moving and did not defend from a central-place.

4. Fish in both lakes were rarely aggressive, highly active, and often moved back over the same areas. However, lake fish which migrated to a tributary stream had no net displacement (central-place foraging) illustrating the immediate effects of current on foraging tactics and space-use.

5. The effect of hydrodynamic environment (flowing vs. still water) on fish behaviour needs to be explicitly considered in future models of salmonine behaviour.
Language eng
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060801 Animal Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©1997, British Ecological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30047975

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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