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Development and physiology of gastric dilation air sacculitis in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

Forgan, L. G. and Forster, M. E. 2007, Development and physiology of gastric dilation air sacculitis in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), Journal of fish diseases, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 459-469, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2761.2007.00832.x.

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Title Development and physiology of gastric dilation air sacculitis in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)
Formatted title Development and physiology of gastric dilation air sacculitis in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)
Author(s) Forgan, L. G.
Forster, M. E.
Journal name Journal of fish diseases
Volume number 30
Issue number 8
Start page 459
End page 469
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2007-08
ISSN 0140-7775
1365-2761
Keyword(s) chinook salmon
cohesion
feed
GDAS
osmoregulation
smooth muscle
Summary The syndrome known as gastric dilation air sacculitis (GDAS) has previously been shown to affect Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in seawater (SW) aquaculture. Feed and osmoregulatory stress have been implicated as potential epidemiological co-factors. The development and physiology of GDAS was investigated in SW and freshwater (FW) adapted smolts. Diet A (low-cohesion pellets) and diet B (high-cohesion pellets) were fed to both FW- and SW-adapted fish. GDAS was induced only in the SW trial on feeding diet A. Stimulated gastro-intestinal (GI) smooth muscle contractility, and fluid transport by the pyloric caeca were different in GDAS-affected fish, which also showed osmoregulatory dysfunction. Cardiac stomach (CS) smooth muscle contractility in response to acetylcholine and potassium chloride (KCl) was significantly reduced in fish fed diet A relative to controls from weeks 3–5. In contrast, maximal pyloric sphincter (PS) circular smooth muscle contraction in response to KCl was significantly elevated in fish fed diet A in weeks 4 and 5. Serum osmolality was elevated in GDAS-affected fish from week 2 of the SW trial. Fluid transport from the mucosal to serosal surface of isolated pyloric caeca was significantly reduced in weeks 3, 4 and 5 in SW fish fed diet A. Gastric evacuation from the stomach of healthy fish was shown to be significantly different when diets of low- and high-cohesion were fed. The results are consistent with the intestinal brake playing a role in the development of the disease.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2761.2007.00832.x
Field of Research 060604 Comparative Physiology
060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
070404 Fish Pests and Diseases
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30048022

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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