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Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on glycogen resynthesis in fasted rats post-high-intensity exercise

Ferreira, Luis D. M. C.-B., Brau, Lambert, Nikolovski, Sasha, Raja, Ghazala, Palmer, T. Norman and Fournier, Paul A. 2001, Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on glycogen resynthesis in fasted rats post-high-intensity exercise, American journal of physiology - endocrinology and metabolism, vol. 280, no. 1, pp. E83-E91.

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Title Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on glycogen resynthesis in fasted rats post-high-intensity exercise
Author(s) Ferreira, Luis D. M. C.-B.
Brau, LambertORCID iD for Brau, Lambert orcid.org/0000-0001-7105-8339
Nikolovski, Sasha
Raja, Ghazala
Palmer, T. Norman
Fournier, Paul A.
Journal name American journal of physiology - endocrinology and metabolism
Volume number 280
Issue number 1
Start page E83
End page E91
Total pages 9
Publisher American Physiological Society
Place of publication Bethesda, Md.
Publication date 2001-01-01
ISSN 0193-1849
1522-1555
Keyword(s) liver
muscle
rats
recovery
Summary It has recently been shown that food intake is not essential for the resynthesis of the stores of muscle glycogen in fasted animals recovering from high-intensity exercise. Because the effect of diabetes on this process has never been examined before, we undertook to explore this issue. To this end, groups of rats were treated with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body mass ip) to induce mild diabetes. After 11 days, each animal was fasted for 24 h before swimming with a lead weight equivalent to 9% body mass attached to the tail. After exercise, the rate and the extent of glycogen repletion in muscles were not affected by diabetes, irrespective of muscle fiber composition. Consistent with these findings, the effect of exercise on the phosphorylation state of glycogen synthase in muscles was only minimally affected by diabetes. In contrast to its effects on nondiabetic animals, exercise in fasted diabetic rats was accompanied by a marked fall in hepatic glycogen levels, which, surprisingly, increased to preexercise levels during recovery despite the absence of food intake.
Language eng
Field of Research 110102 Medical Biochemistry: Carbohydrates
110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, the American Physiological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30048030

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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