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Post-exercise muscle glycogen repletion in the extreme : effect of food absence and active recovery

Fournier, Paul A., Fairchild, Timothy J., Ferreira, Luis D. and Brau, Lambert 2004, Post-exercise muscle glycogen repletion in the extreme : effect of food absence and active recovery, Journal of sports science and medicine, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 139-146.

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Title Post-exercise muscle glycogen repletion in the extreme : effect of food absence and active recovery
Author(s) Fournier, Paul A.
Fairchild, Timothy J.
Ferreira, Luis D.
Brau, LambertORCID iD for Brau, Lambert orcid.org/0000-0001-7105-8339
Journal name Journal of sports science and medicine
Volume number 3
Issue number 3
Start page 139
End page 146
Total pages 8
Publisher Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Place of publication Bursa, Turkey
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1303-2968
Keyword(s) cori cycle
glycogen phosphorylase
glycogen synthase
glyconeogenesis
Summary Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one's ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses.
Language eng
Field of Research 110102 Medical Biochemistry: Carbohydrates
110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30048096

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.