General medical practitioners’ knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis and its investigation and management

Otmar, Renee, Reventlow, Susanne D., Nicholson, Geoffrey C., Kotowicz, Mark A. and Pasco, Julie A. 2012, General medical practitioners’ knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis and its investigation and management, Archives of osteoporosis, vol. 7, no. 1-2, pp. 107-114.

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Title General medical practitioners’ knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis and its investigation and management
Author(s) Otmar, Renee
Reventlow, Susanne D.
Nicholson, Geoffrey C.
Kotowicz, Mark A.
Pasco, Julie A.
Journal name Archives of osteoporosis
Volume number 7
Issue number 1-2
Start page 107
End page 114
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer UK
Place of publication Surrey, England
Publication date 2012-12
ISSN 1862-3522
1862-3514
Keyword(s) osteoporosis
qualitative methods
general medical practitioners
Summary Summary This qualitative study explored beliefs and attitudes regarding osteoporosis and its management. General medical practitioners (GPs) were ambivalent about osteoporosis due to concern about financial barriers for patients and their own beliefs about the salience of osteoporosis. GPs considered investigation and treatment in the context of patients' whole lives.

Purpose We aimed to investigate barriers, enablers, and other factors influencing the investigation and management of osteoporosis using a qualitative approach. This paper analyses data from discussions with general medical practitioners (GPs) about their beliefs and attitudes regarding osteoporosis and its management.

Methods Fourteen GPs and two practice nurses aged 27–89 years participated in four focus groups, from June 2010 to March 2011. Each group comprised 3–5 participants, and discussions were semi-structured, according to the protocol developed for the main study. Discussion points ranged from the circumstances under which GPs would initiate investigation for osteoporosis and their subsequent actions to their views about treatment efficacy and patient adherence to prescribed treatment. Audio recordings were transcribed and coded for analysis using analytic comparison to identify the major themes.

Results The GPs were not particularly concerned about osteoporosis in their patients or the general population, ranking diabetes, osteoarthritis, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension higher than concern about osteoporosis. They expressed confidence in the efficacy of anti-fracture medications but were concerned about the potential financial burden on patients with limited incomes. The GPs were unsure about guidelines for investigation and management of osteoporosis in men and the appropriate duration of treatment, particularly for the bisphosphonates in all patients.

Conclusions The GPs' ambivalence about osteoporosis appeared to stem from structural factors such as financial barriers for patients and their own beliefs about the salience of osteoporosis. GPs considered the impact of investigating and prescribing treatment in the context of patients' whole lives.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30048542

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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