You are not logged in.

Assessing effects of diel period, gear selectivity and predation on patterns of microhabitat use by fish in a mangrove dominated system in SE Australia

Smith, Timothy M. and Hindell, Jeremy S. 2005, Assessing effects of diel period, gear selectivity and predation on patterns of microhabitat use by fish in a mangrove dominated system in SE Australia, Marine ecology progress series, vol. 294, pp. 257-270, doi: 10.3354/meps294257.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Assessing effects of diel period, gear selectivity and predation on patterns of microhabitat use by fish in a mangrove dominated system in SE Australia
Author(s) Smith, Timothy M.ORCID iD for Smith, Timothy M. orcid.org/0000-0001-8612-8600
Hindell, Jeremy S.
Journal name Marine ecology progress series
Volume number 294
Start page 257
End page 270
Total pages 14
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Keyword(s) Temperate
Mangroves
Fish assemblages
Microhabitat
Predation
Diel
Summary The relative value of temperate mangroves to fish, and the processes driving patterns of microhabitat use within this habitat, are unknown. There are 3 quickly identifiable microhabitats within temperate Australian mangroves: (1) forest (the area of mangroves with trees); (2) pneumatophores (the area directly seaward of the forest without trees but with pneumatophores [aerial roots]); and (3) channel (the area directly seaward of the pneumatophores without gross structural attributes such as trees or pneumatophores). Duplicate fyke and gill nets were both initially used to sample fish in the 3 microhabitats described above. Sampling took place across the seaward edge of mangroves on 10 sampling occasions (5 night and 5 day), in a large estuarine system in SE Australia. Fish assemblages (693 fish from 20 species and 15 families) varied significantly (p < 0.05) between the forest and the channel, and between diel periods for each gear (net type), but there was little difference in the assemblage structure of fish between forest–pneumatophore or pneumatophore–channel microhabitats. Juvenile lifestages (61% of all fish) and commercially important taxa (76%) were common. Abundance, biomass and species richness of fish were generally lower in the forest than the other microhabitats, but this pattern varied significantly (p < 0.05) between diel periods, among sampling occasions, and with water depth. Highly quantitative pop nets provided a preliminary assessment of whether differential gear selectivity caused patterns between microhabitats, but less rich fish assemblages were again recorded in forests than in pneumatophores. The importance of predation in structuring fish assemblages across microhabitats was assessed by measuring survival of juvenile fish tethered in 3 predation treatments (predator exclusion, cage control, and uncaged). Survival rates were high across the predator treatments and did not vary among microhabitats. The variation in fish assemblages across microhabitats within mangroves was not consistent with a model of mangrove structure providing a refuge for juvenile fish from predation, but instead could indicate differences in efficiency of gear types among microhabitats and/or other ‘edge effect’-driven processes such as the provision of food and/or shelter.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/meps294257
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Inter-Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30048664

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 147 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 25 Sep 2012, 15:44:52 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.