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Residency and spatial use by reef sharks of an isolated seamount and its implications for conservation

Barnett, Adam, Abrantes, Katya G., Seymour, Jamie and Fitzpatrick, Richard 2012, Residency and spatial use by reef sharks of an isolated seamount and its implications for conservation, PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 5, Article number: e36574, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036574.

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Title Residency and spatial use by reef sharks of an isolated seamount and its implications for conservation
Author(s) Barnett, Adam
Abrantes, Katya G.
Seymour, Jamie
Fitzpatrick, Richard
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 7
Issue number 5
Season Article number: e36574
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-05-16
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) animals
conservation of natural resources
sharks
Summary Although marine protected areas (MPAs) are a common conservation strategy, these areas are often designed with little prior knowledge of the spatial behaviour of the species they are designed to protect. Currently, the Coral Sea area and its seamounts (north-east Australia) are under review to determine if MPAs are warranted. The protection of sharks at these seamounts should be an integral component of conservation plans. Therefore, knowledge on the spatial ecology of sharks at the Coral Sea seamounts is essential for the appropriate implementation of management and conservation plans. Acoustic telemetry was used to determine residency, site fidelity and spatial use of three shark species at Osprey Reef: whitetip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus, grey reef sharks Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and silvertip sharks Carcharhinus albimarginatus. Most individuals showed year round residency at Osprey Reef, although five of the 49 individuals tagged moved to the neighbouring Shark Reef (∼14 km away) and one grey reef shark completed a round trip of ∼250 km to the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally, individuals of white tip and grey reef sharks showed strong site fidelity to the areas they were tagged, and there was low spatial overlap between groups of sharks tagged at different locations. Spatial use at Osprey Reef by adult sharks is generally restricted to the north-west corner. The high residency and limited spatial use of Osprey Reef suggests that reef sharks would be highly vulnerable to targeted fishing pressure and that MPAs incorporating no-take of sharks would be effective in protecting reef shark populations at Osprey and Shark Reef.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0036574
Field of Research 070403 Fisheries Management
Socio Economic Objective 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Barnett et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30048806

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.