Drugs, ships and containers : how anti-terrorism benefits shipping security

Martin, Timothy A. 2011, Drugs, ships and containers : how anti-terrorism benefits shipping security, Strategic insights, vol. 31, pp. 12-16.

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Title Drugs, ships and containers : how anti-terrorism benefits shipping security
Author(s) Martin, Timothy A.
Journal name Strategic insights
Volume number 31
Start page 12
End page 16
Total pages 5
Publisher Risk Intelligence
Place of publication Vedbaek, Denmark
Publication date 2011-03
Keyword(s) maritime security
narcotics trafficking
Summary Using ships to transport illicit drugs is not new; nor is the practice of concealing them
in shipping containers decreasing – or is it? This article questions whether recent container security initiatives created to stop terrorism have also achieved a decrease in the use of containers for smuggling illicit drugs. Or, are these maritime security regimes creating a false sense of achievement, being too limited in scope to be truly useful in this secondary role? Logically, improved detection of illicit drugs in containers shipped by sea is more likely when port personnel are better trained, x-ray scanners installed, port fencing improved and official collaboration encouraged. However, since the number of containers being electronically screened and physically searched has only marginally improved, the question is, is it enough?
Language eng
Field of Research 160604 Defence Studies
Socio Economic Objective 810107 National Security
HERDC Research category C3 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30049414

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Created: Fri, 16 Nov 2012, 12:05:54 EST by Tim Martin

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