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Technophilia, neo-Luddism, eDependency and the judgement of Thamus

Coulthard, Darryl and Keller, Susan 2012, Technophilia, neo-Luddism, eDependency and the judgement of Thamus, Journal of information, communication and ethics in society, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 262-272.

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Title Technophilia, neo-Luddism, eDependency and the judgement of Thamus
Author(s) Coulthard, Darryl
Keller, Susan
Journal name Journal of information, communication and ethics in society
Volume number 10
Issue number 4
Start page 262
End page 272
Total pages 11
Publisher Emerald
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1477-996X
1758-8871
Keyword(s) edependency
technophilia
technology appropriation
social ecology
moral character
information technology
information systems
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to reflect on society's relationship with technology and particularly our increasing dependence on electronic technology – so-called eDependency. The paper argues that technology is not neutral and we must engage with the moral issues that arise from our relationship with it.

Design/methodology/approach –
Society's relationship with technology is examined through the lens of Socrates' consideration of the technology of writing. It identifies “technophilia” as a major theme in society and “neo-Luddism” as the Socrates-like examination of the benefits of technology.

Findings – While rejecting both technology determinism and technology presentism the paper argues technology is not neutral and does afford social change within a particular social ecology. The authors suggest that ultimately the use of all technology, including the technology underpinning eDependency, leads to important moral questions which deserve considered debate. The paper concludes by arguing that the Information Systems (IS) discipline should take the mantle of King Thamus and that the study of these issues should become a key concern for the discipline.

Originality/value – In an age of technophilia, this paper calls considered debate on the moral issues that arise from our relationship with technology, how it is appropriated, to whose benefit, and how we change it and will be changed by it.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 080699 Information Systems not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2012
Copyright notice ©2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30049517

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.