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Contemporary planning education and Indigenous cultural competency agendas : erasing terra nullius, respect and responsibility

Rose, Mark and Jones, David S. 2012, Contemporary planning education and Indigenous cultural competency agendas : erasing terra nullius, respect and responsibility, in ANZAPS 2012 : Proceedings of the Australian & New Zealand Association of Planning Schools Conference, La Trobe University, Community Planning and Development Program, Bendigo, Vic., pp. 179-187.

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Title Contemporary planning education and Indigenous cultural competency agendas : erasing terra nullius, respect and responsibility
Author(s) Rose, Mark
Jones, David S.
Conference name Australian & New Zealand Association of Planning Schools. Conference (2012 : Bendigo, Vic.)
Conference location Bendigo, Vic.
Conference dates 21-23 Sep. 2012
Title of proceedings ANZAPS 2012 : Proceedings of the Australian & New Zealand Association of Planning Schools Conference
Editor(s) Butt, Andrew
Kennedy, Melissa
Publication date 2012
Conference series Australian & New Zealand Association of Planning Schools. Conference
Start page 179
End page 187
Total pages 9
Publisher La Trobe University, Community Planning and Development Program
Place of publication Bendigo, Vic.
Keyword(s) indigenous cultural competency
planning education
professional accreditation policies
Summary As noted in Universities Australia’s (2011a, 2011b) investigations into Indigenous Cultural Competency, most universities have struggled with successfully devising and achieving a translation of Indigenous protocols into their curricula. Walliss & Grant (2000: 65) have also concluded that, given the nature of the built environment disciplines, including planning, and their professional practice activities, there is a “need for specific cultural awareness education” to service these disciplines and not just attempts to insert Indigenous perspectives into their curricula. Bradley’s policy initiative at the University of South Australia (1997-2007), “has not achieved its goal of incorporation of Indigenous perspectives into all its undergraduate programs by 2010, it has achieved an incorporation rate of 61%” (Universities Australia 2011a: 9; http://www.unisa.edu.au/ducier/icup/default.asp).

Contextually, Bradley’s strategic educational aim at University of South Australia led a social reformist agenda, which has been continued in Universities Australia’s release of Indigenous Cultural Competency (2011a; 2011b) reports that has attracted mixed media criticism (Trounson 2012a: 5, 2012b: 5) and concerns that it represents “social engineering” rather than enhancing “criticism as a pedagogical tool ... as a means of advancing knowledge” (Melleuish 2012: 10). While the Planning Institute of Australia’s (PIA) Indigenous Planning Policy Working Party has observed that fundamental changes are needed to the way Australian planning education addresses Indigenous perspectives and interests, it has concluded that planners “! perceptual limitations of their own discipline and the particular discourse of our own craft” were hindering enhanced learning outcomes (Wensing 2007: 2). Gurran (PIA 2007) has noted that the core curriculum in planning includes an expectation of “knowledge of ! Indigenous Australian cultures, including relationships between their physical environment and associated social and economic systems” but that it has not been addressed. This paper critiques these discourses and offers an Indigenous perspective of the debate.
ISBN 9780987342928
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, ANZAPS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30049553

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