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Click if you like this or occupy as spectacle : situationism and a technological derive

D'Cruz, Glenn and de Bruyn, Dirk 2012, Click if you like this or occupy as spectacle : situationism and a technological derive, in Transdisciplinary Arts Research : At the Intersection between Arts, Science and Culture, Federation Hall, Melbourne, Vic., 23 Jun. 2012.

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Click to show the corresponding preview debruyn-clickifyou-2012.mp4 Published version Click to show the corresponding preview/stream video/mp4 66.32MB 7

Performance name Click if you like this or occupy as spectacle : situationism and a technological derive
Creator(s) D'Cruz, Glenn
de Bruyn, Dirk
Year presented/published 2012
Publisher University of Melbourne : Victorian College of the Arts
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Event name Transdisciplinary Arts Research : At the Intersection between Arts, Science and Culture
Performance venue Federation Hall, Melbourne, Vic.
Performance dates 23 Jun. 2012
Description of performance Multimedia performance with two voices, projection and megaphone; 22.50 mins
Summary This performative, multi-media lecture re-reads Guy Debord’s book, The Society of the Spectacle (1967) with reference to the global Occupy movement, and the role social media and the Internet play in the facilitation and hindrance of this recent form of political activism. Debord claims that all ‘having’ — that is, all forms of accumulating capital — ‘derives its immediate prestige and its ultimate purpose from appearances’, and that individual reality, which is shaped by social forces, can ‘appear only if it is not actually real (Debord, thesis 18).’ Using the multiple functions and staggering proliferation of various image making technologies used to record and represent OCCUPY actions as a starting point, we respond to Debord’s proposition by examining the ways his analysis of the spectacle both enables and impedes a thorough critique of social media as a spectacular technology par excellence. Part reflective essay, part critical analysis, and part performance, ‘Click if You Like This’ connects various situationist strategies of ‘artistic interference’ — such as the dérive and détournement — with expanded cinema in order to generate a series of questions and provocations about the politics of place, the degradation of social space, networked images and the ubiquity of contemporary ‘spectacular’ technologies, which have colonized all forms of everyday life. This presentation questions whether contemporary forms and strategies of interference are the same as their historical precedents.
Keyword(s) Multimedia
situationism
occupy movement
performance-expanded cinema
Notes Transdisciplinary Arts Research : At the Intersection between Arts, Science and Culture was the theme for The Second International Conference on Transdisciplinary Imaging at the Intersections between Art, Science and Culture held on 22-23 June, 2012 at the Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne, Vic.
Audio Visual Presentations
Language eng
Field of Research 190404 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies
190504 Performance and Installation Art
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category J1 Major original creative work
ERA Research output type JR2 Recorded or rendered creative works - Performance
Copyright notice ©2012, University of Melbourne : Victorian College of the Arts
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050042

Document type: Performance
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Created: Wed, 09 Jan 2013, 10:44:06 EST by Dirk De Bruyn

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.