Elaborative relational structures in the research prose of sociology : an intercultural study

Golebiowski, Zosia 2012, Elaborative relational structures in the research prose of sociology : an intercultural study, in ALAA 2012 : Evolving paradigms : language and applied linguistics in a changing world : Proceedings of the Applied Linguistics Association of Australia 2012 conference, Curtin University, Perth, W. A., pp. 21-21.

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Title Elaborative relational structures in the research prose of sociology : an intercultural study
Author(s) Golebiowski, Zosia
Conference name Applied Linguistics Association of Australia. Conference (2012 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 12 - 14 Nov. 2012
Title of proceedings ALAA 2012 : Evolving paradigms : language and applied linguistics in a changing world : Proceedings of the Applied Linguistics Association of Australia 2012 conference
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2012
Conference series Applied Linguistics Association of Australia Conference
Start page 21
End page 21
Total pages 1
Publisher Curtin University
Place of publication Perth, W. A.
Keyword(s) linguistics
coherence relations
intercultural academic writing
Summary This paper investigates elaborative relational structures utilised by native English speaking and native Polish speaking scholars in sociology research articles written in English. The examined texts have been produced in American, Australian and Polish academic discourse communities. The study utilised the framework of the analysis of the rhetorical structure of tests (FARS) as an analytical tool (Golebiowski 2009, 2011). The following types of elaboration relations are discussed : amplification, extension, reformulation, explanation, instantiation and addition. Elaboration is analysed with respect to its textual function, frequency of employment, hierarchical location, recursiveness, discoursal prominence and explicitness. The elaborative systems in the examined texts are shown to be complex, with pervasive presence of multi-stage recursive structures. It is suggested that elaborativeness may be a general characteristic of the style of writing sociology, which, as a relatively new discipline, requires establishing of wide grounds for the proposed claims, where writers persuade their readers not only of the specific claims of their text, but also of frameworks of thought in which the claims are placed. It is hypothesized that the similarities in the elaborativeness across texts result from the shared stylistic conventions and traditions of the disciplinary research community of sociology, while differences in the mode of employment of elaboration relations are attributed to cultural norms and conventions as well as educational systems prevailing within the discourse communities constituting the social contexts of the studied texts.
Golebiowski, Z. (2011). Scholarly criticism across discourse communities. In Salager-Meyer, Françoise and Lewin, Beverly A. (eds), Crossed words : Criticism in scholarly writing, pp. 203-224, Peter Lang International Academic Publishers, Berlin, Germany.
Golebiowski Z. (2009). The use of contrastive strategies in a sociology research paper: A cross-cultural study. In Suomela-Salmi, Eija and Dervin, Fred (eds), Cross-linguistic and cross-cultural perspectives on academic discourse, pp. 165-186, John Benjamins Publishing Company, Philadelphia.
Language eng
Field of Research 200303 English as a Second Language
Socio Economic Objective 950201 Communication Across Languages and Culture
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050114

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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