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Three year follow-up of an early childhood intervention : is movement skill sustained?

Zask, Avigdor, Barnett, Lisa M., Rose, Lauren, Brooks, Lyndon O., Molyneux, Maxine, Hughes, Denise, Adam, Jillian and Salmon, Jo 2012, Three year follow-up of an early childhood intervention : is movement skill sustained?, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 9, no. 127, pp. 1-9.

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Title Three year follow-up of an early childhood intervention : is movement skill sustained?
Author(s) Zask, Avigdor
Barnett, Lisa M.
Rose, Lauren
Brooks, Lyndon O.
Molyneux, Maxine
Hughes, Denise
Adam, Jillian
Salmon, Jo
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 9
Issue number 127
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-10-22
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) preschool
intervention
object control
locomotor
sex
Summary Background
Movement skill competence (e.g. the ability to throw, run and kick) is a potentially important physical activity determinant. However, little is known about the long-term impact of interventions to improve movement skills in early childhood. This study aimed to determine whether intervention preschool children were still more skill proficient than controls three years after a 10 month movement skill focused intervention: ‘Tooty Fruity Vegie in Preschools’.

Methods
Children from 18 intervention and 13 control preschools in NSW, Australia were assessed at ages four (Time1), five (T2) and eight years (T3) for locomotor (run, gallop, hop, leap, horizontal jump, slide) and object control proficiency (strike, bounce, catch, kick, overhand throw, underhand roll) using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. Multi-level object control and locomotor regression models were fitted with variables time, intervention (yes/no) and a time*intervention interaction. Both models added sex of child and retained if significant, in which case interactions of sex of child with other variables were modelled and retained. SPSS (Version 17.0) was used.

Results
Overall follow-up rate was 29% (163/560). Of the 137 students used in the regression models, 53% were female (n = 73). Intervention girls maintained their object control skill advantage in comparison to controls at T3 (p = .002), but intervention boys did not (p = .591). At T3, there were no longer intervention/control differences in locomotor skill (p = .801).

Conclusion
Early childhood settings should implement movement skill interventions and more intensively target girls and object control skills.
Language eng
Field of Research 110603 Motor Control
111716 Preventive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050139

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.