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Promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior in disadvantaged neighborhoods : a qualitative study of what women want

Teychenne, Megan, Ball, Kylie and Salmon, Jo 2012, Promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior in disadvantaged neighborhoods : a qualitative study of what women want, PLoS one, vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 1-8.

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Title Promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior in disadvantaged neighborhoods : a qualitative study of what women want
Author(s) Teychenne, Megan
Ball, Kylie
Salmon, Jo
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 7
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-11-14
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) access to information
community
community living
disadvantaged neighborhood
feasibility study
high risk population
sedentary lifestyle
women's health
Summary Since women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods are more likely to be physically inactive and engage in higher levels of sedentary behavior than women living in more advantaged neighborhoods, it is important to develop and test the feasibility of strategies aimed to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior amongst this high-risk target group. Thirty-seven women (aged 19–85) living in a disadvantaged neighborhood, and five key stakeholders, received a suite of potential intervention materials and completed a qualitative questionnaire assessing the perceived feasibility of strategies aimed to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. Thematic analyses were performed. Women perceived the use of a locally-relevant information booklet as a feasible strategy to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. Including weight-loss information was suggested to motivate women to be active. Half the women felt the best delivery method was mailed leaflets. Other suggestions included reference books and websites. Many women mentioned that an online activity calendar was motivational but too time-consuming to commit to. Most women preferred the information booklet as a strategy to increase physical activity/reduce sedentary behavior, yet several suggested that using the booklet together with the online calendar may be more effective. These findings make an important contribution to research informing the development of intervention strategies to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior amongst women living in disadvantaged neighborhoods.
Notes This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Teychenne et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050154

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.