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Perceived quality and availability of fruit and vegetables are associated with perceptions of fruit and vegetable affordability among socio-economically disadvantaged women

Williams, Lauren K., Thornton, Lukar, Crawford, David and Ball, Kylie 2012, Perceived quality and availability of fruit and vegetables are associated with perceptions of fruit and vegetable affordability among socio-economically disadvantaged women, Public health nutrition, vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 1262-1267.

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Title Perceived quality and availability of fruit and vegetables are associated with perceptions of fruit and vegetable affordability among socio-economically disadvantaged women
Author(s) Williams, Lauren K.
Thornton, Lukar
Crawford, David
Ball, Kylie
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 15
Issue number 7
Start page 1262
End page 1267
Total pages 6
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) socio-economically disadvantaged women
fruit and vegetable affordability
fruit and vegetable availability
social support
Summary Objective Perceptions that fruit and vegetables are expensive have been found to be associated with lower consumption of fruit and vegetables among disadvantaged women; however, the determinants of these perceptions are relatively unknown. The purpose of the current paper is to examine whether perceived availability and quality of fruit and vegetables, and social support for healthy eating, are associated with perceptions of fruit and vegetable affordability among women residing in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Design Cross-sectional self-report survey.

Setting The study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia.

Subjects An Australian sample of 4131 women, aged 18–45 years, residing in neighbourhoods ranked in the lowest Victorian tertile of relative disadvantage by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, an index that considers aspects of disadvantage such as residents’ income, education, motor vehicle access and employment.

Results Results showed that irrespective of education, income and other key covariates, women who perceived poor availability and quality of fruit and vegetables in their local neighbourhood were more likely to perceive fruit and vegetables as expensive.

Conclusions Our results suggest that perceptions of fruit and vegetable affordability are not driven exclusively by lack of financial or knowledge-related resources, but also by women's psychological response and interpretation of their local nutrition environment.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050156

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.