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You say security, we say safety : speaking and talking ‘security’ in Kyrgyzstan

Wilkinson, Cai 2007, You say security, we say safety : speaking and talking ‘security’ in Kyrgyzstan, in CPS Working Papers No. 10, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway, pp. 183-194.

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Title You say security, we say safety : speaking and talking ‘security’ in Kyrgyzstan
Author(s) Wilkinson, CaiORCID iD for Wilkinson, Cai orcid.org/0000-0002-8702-750X
Conference name Methodologies in peace research. Conference (2007 : Tromsø, Norway)
Conference location Tromsø, Norway
Conference dates 21-23 Mar. 2007
Title of proceedings CPS Working Papers No. 10
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2007
Conference series Methodologies in peace research. Conference
Start page 183
End page 194
Total pages 12
Publisher University of Tromso
Place of publication Tromso, Norway
Keyword(s) Kyrgyzstan
security
fieldwork
positionality
Summary The Copenhagen School's notion of securitization is widely recognised as an important theoretical innovation in the conceptualisation of security, not least for its potential for including a range of actors and spatial scales beyond the state. However, its empirical utility remains more open to question due to a lack of reflexivity regarding local socio-cultural contexts, narrow focus on speech and inherently retrospective nature. Drawing on fieldwork conducted by the author in Kyrgyzstan between September 2005 and June 2006, this paper will examine the implications of these limitations for conducting empirical research on "security" logistically and methodologically. Centrally, the question of how “security” can be researched in the field will be discussed. Consideration will be given to the researcher’s role in talking “security” and how “security” can effectively be located and explicated through the creation of ethnomethodological “thick description”. Issues of contingency, multiple voices and power loci, and inter-cultural translation will be addressed. The paper will conclude with a consideration of how local knowledge can be used to inform our research and help find ways to bridge the divide between the field and theory.
ISSN 1503-1365
Language eng
Field of Research 160607 International Relations
Socio Economic Objective 940399 International Relations not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2007, University of Tromso
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050291

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Created: Wed, 23 Jan 2013, 16:05:37 EST by Cai Wilkinson

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.