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What’s in a name? The personal and political meanings of 'LGBT' for non-heterosexual and transgender youth in Kyrgyzstan

Wilkinson, Cai and Kirey, Anna 2010, What’s in a name? The personal and political meanings of 'LGBT' for non-heterosexual and transgender youth in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asian survey, vol. 29, no. 4, Special issue: Youth in the former Soviet south: Everyday lives between experimentation and regulation, pp. 485-499, doi: 10.1080/02634937.2010.533970.

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Title What’s in a name? The personal and political meanings of 'LGBT' for non-heterosexual and transgender youth in Kyrgyzstan
Author(s) Wilkinson, CaiORCID iD for Wilkinson, Cai orcid.org/0000-0002-8702-750X
Kirey, Anna
Journal name Central Asian survey
Volume number 29
Issue number 4
Season Special issue: Youth in the former Soviet south: Everyday lives between experimentation and regulation
Start page 485
End page 499
Total pages 15
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Oxon, England
Publication date 2010-12
ISSN 0263-4937
1465-3354
Keyword(s) LGBT
sexual citizenship
Kyrgyzstan
non-heterosexual identities
transgender
homosexual
youth
stigma management
Summary In this article, we focus on the ways in which non-heterosexual and transgender youth involved with the non-governmental organization ‘Labrys’ in Kyrgyzstan have begun to demand the protection of their basic civil and human rights on the basis of self-identification as ‘LGBT’. This acronym, which stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender, is relatively new to Kyrgyzstan and other post-Soviet states, and represents a change in the terms used by non-heterosexual and transgender people to describe themselves. We frame our discussion using the concepts of sexual citizenship, private/public divides and stigma and base our discussion on debates amongst the staff and community of Labrys about the purpose and scope of the organization. Centrally, we suggest that the strategic use of ‘LGBT’ as a public and politicized identity represents a new, pro-active form of stigma management. By employing this strategy, young LGBT people become ‘would-be’ sexual citizens and challenge traditional societal norms that seek to keep discussion of sex and sexuality in the private sphere and restrict rights to heterosexual, cisgender citizens.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/02634937.2010.533970
Field of Research 160810 Urban Sociology and Community Studies
169901 Gender Specific Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050293

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Created: Wed, 23 Jan 2013, 16:16:20 EST by Cai Wilkinson

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