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A longitudinal examination of burden and psychological distress in carers of people with an eating disorder

Coomber, Kerri and King, Ross M. 2013, A longitudinal examination of burden and psychological distress in carers of people with an eating disorder, Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 163-171, doi: 10.1007/s00127-012-0524-7.

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Title A longitudinal examination of burden and psychological distress in carers of people with an eating disorder
Author(s) Coomber, Kerri
King, Ross M.ORCID iD for King, Ross M. orcid.org/0000-0002-0819-7077
Journal name Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
Volume number 48
Issue number 1
Start page 163
End page 171
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publication date 2013-01
ISSN 0933-7954
1433-9285
Keyword(s) eating disorders
carers
longitudinal
carer burden
psychological distress
Summary Purpose
Eating disorders are chronic conditions that require ongoing, high level care. Despite the chronic nature of eating disorders, to date, previous research examining eating disorder carer burden and psychological distress has been cross-sectional only. Therefore, the current study aimed to conduct a preliminary longitudinal examination of the predictors of carer burden and psychological distress for carers of those with an eating disorder.
Methods
A self-report, quantitative questionnaire approach was utilised. Forty-two carers completed three self-report questionnaires over a period of 9 months (initial, 4½ and 9 months) assessing carer burden, psychological distress, carer needs, expressed emotion, coping strategies and social support.
Results
Maladaptive coping, expressed emotion and carer needs were significant longitudinal predictors of carer burden. Carer psychological distress could not be predicted longitudinally.
Conclusions
In order to reduce carer burden, interventions should test whether reducing maladaptive coping strategies, expressed emotion and addressing carer needs lead to lower carer burden and distress.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00127-012-0524-7
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920202 Carer Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, John Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050409

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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Created: Tue, 05 Feb 2013, 12:12:18 EST by Jane Moschetti

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