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Differences between 9-11 year old British Pakistani and White British girls in physical activity and behavior during school recess

Pollard, Tessa, Hornby-Turner, Yvonne C., Ghurbhurrun, Adarshini and Ridgers, Nicola D. 2012, Differences between 9-11 year old British Pakistani and White British girls in physical activity and behavior during school recess, BMC public health, vol. 12, no. 1087, pp. 1-8.

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Title Differences between 9-11 year old British Pakistani and White British girls in physical activity and behavior during school recess
Author(s) Pollard, Tessa
Hornby-Turner, Yvonne C.
Ghurbhurrun, Adarshini
Ridgers, Nicola D.
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 12
Issue number 1087
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-12-18
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) physical activity
recess
playtime
South Asian
Pakistani
ethnicity
children
girls
school
accelerometry
Summary Background School recess provides an important opportunity for children to engage in physical activity. Previous studies indicate that children and adults of South Asian origin are less active than other ethnic groups in the United Kingdom, but have not investigated whether activity differs within the shared school environment. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that British Pakistani girls aged 9–11 years are less active during recess than White British girls.

Methods In Study One, the proportion of recess spent by 137 White British (N = 70) and British Pakistani (N = 67) girls in sedentary behavior, moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) and vigorous activity (VPA) was determined using accelerometry. In Study Two, 86 White British (N = 48) and British Pakistani (N = 38) girls were observed on the playground using the System for Observing Children’s Activity and Relationships during Play (SOCARP). Accelerometry data were collected during observations to allow identification of activities contributing to objectively measured physical activity.

Results Accelerometry data indicated that British Pakistani girls spent 2.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 4.3) less of their total recess time in MVPA and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.4) less in VPA than White British girls. Direct observation showed that British Pakistani girls spent 12.0% (95% CI: 2.9, 21.1) less playground time being very active, and 12.3% (95% CI: 1.7, 23.0) less time playing games. Time spent being very active according to direct observation data correlated significantly with accelerometer-assessed time spent in MVPA and VPA, and time spent playing games correlated significantly with accelerometer-assessed time spent in VPA, suggesting that differences in behavior observed in Study Two may have contributed to the differences in time spent in MVPA and VPA in Study One.

Conclusions British Pakistani girls were less active than White British girls during school recess. Recess has been identified as a potentially important target for the delivery of physical activity interventions; such interventions should consider ways in which the activity levels of British Pakistani girls could be increased.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Pollard et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050443

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