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Blood pressure modifies retinal susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation

He, Zheng, Nguyen, Christine T. O., Armitage, James A., Vingrys, Algis J. and Bui, Bang V. 2012, Blood pressure modifies retinal susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation, PLoS one, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031104.

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Title Blood pressure modifies retinal susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation
Author(s) He, Zheng
Nguyen, Christine T. O.
Armitage, James A.
Vingrys, Algis J.
Bui, Bang V.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-02-16
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) animals
blood flow velocity
blood pressure
disease susceptibility
electroretinography
open-angle glaucoma
intraocular pressure
ccular hypertension
rats
retina
Summary Primary open angle glaucoma affects more than 67 million people. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a risk factor for glaucoma and may reduce nutrient availability by decreasing ocular perfusion pressure (OPP). An interaction between arterial blood pressure and IOP determines OPP; but the exact contribution that these factors have for retinal function is not fully understood. Here we sought to determine how acute modifications of arterial pressure will affect the susceptibility of neuronal function and blood flow to IOP challenge. Anaesthetized (ketamine:xylazine) Long-Evan rats with low (~60 mmHg, sodium nitroprusside infusion), moderate (~100 mmHg, saline), or high levels (~160 mmHg, angiotensin II) of mean arterial pressure (MAP, n = 5–10 per group) were subjected to IOP challenge (10–120 mmHg, 5 mmHg steps every 3 minutes). Electroretinograms were measured at each IOP step to assess bipolar cell (b-wave) and inner retinal function (scotopic threshold response or STR). Ocular blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry in groups with similar MAP level and the same IOP challenge protocol. Both b-wave and STR amplitudes decreased with IOP elevation. Retinal function was less susceptible to IOP challenge when MAP was high, whereas the converse was true for low MAP. Consistent with the effects on retinal function, higher IOP was needed to attenuated ocular blood flow in animals with higher MAP. The susceptibility of retinal function to IOP challenge can be ameliorated by acute high BP, and exacerbated by low BP. This is partially mediated by modifications in ocular blood flow.
Notes This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0031104
Field of Research 111303 Vision Science
Socio Economic Objective 920107 Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Public Library of Science
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050444

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.