Indigenising civil society : applying Ibn Khaldun’s asabiya concept on tribes in Iraq

Hassin, Ahmed 2012, Indigenising civil society : applying Ibn Khaldun’s asabiya concept on tribes in Iraq, in Change and Continuity in the Middle East and Central Asia : Postgraduate Conference 2012, Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies (The Middle East and Central Asia), ANU College of Arts and Social Science, Canberra, A.C.T., pp. 1-16.

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Title Indigenising civil society : applying Ibn Khaldun’s asabiya concept on tribes in Iraq
Formatted title Indigenising civil society : applying Ibn Khaldun’s asabiya concept on tribes in Iraq
Author(s) Hassin, Ahmed
Conference name Change and Continuity in the Middle East and Central Asia. Postgraduate Conference (2012 : Canberra, A.C.T.)
Conference location Canberra, A.C.T.
Conference dates 30 Nov–1 Dec. 2012
Title of proceedings Change and Continuity in the Middle East and Central Asia : Postgraduate Conference 2012
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2012
Conference series Change and Continuity in the Middle East and Central Asia Postgraduate Conference
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies (The Middle East and Central Asia), ANU College of Arts and Social Science
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Keyword(s) Iraq
tribe
nation building
Summary After the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, civil society has become among the buzz words that are frequently used by local and international government and non-government institutions. However, the connotations of civil society were merely drawn from Western conceptions referring to formally organised types of institutions, like NGOs, unions and media. This paper argues that Muslim/Arab theories should also be tested in their original indigenous societies before generalisation of Western models. The Western conceptualisation overlooks the informal type of civil society organisations and excludes family and kinship ties from its equation. Indigenous social structures, i.e. tribes are key active player in the daily life of the Iraqi political, economic, social and cultural scenes. This study argues that the spirit of social solidarity drawn from Ibn Khaldun’s “asabiya” concepts as well as functions of civil society organisations are the bases for examining tribes in Iraq. Tribes have played significant roles in conflict management, peace-building, reconciliation, policy-formulation, advocacy, active citizenship and democratisation since 2003. The article concludes that, based on their sense of solidarity that is the impetus to functions, tribes are among the active civil society organisations in Iraq.
Language eng
Field of Research 160609 Political Theory and Political Philosophy
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2012
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050515

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
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