Social disadvantage, bone mineral density and vertebral wedge deformities in the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort

Brennan, S. L., Winzenberg, T. M., Pasco, J. A., Wluka, A. E., Dobbins, A. G. and Jones, G. 2013, Social disadvantage, bone mineral density and vertebral wedge deformities in the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort, Osteoporosis international, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 1909-1916.

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Title Social disadvantage, bone mineral density and vertebral wedge deformities in the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort
Author(s) Brennan, S. L.
Winzenberg, T. M.
Pasco, J. A.
Wluka, A. E.
Dobbins, A. G.
Jones, G.
Journal name Osteoporosis international
Volume number 24
Issue number 6
Start page 1909
End page 1916
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer UK
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-06
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Keyword(s) bone mineral density
older adults
social disadvantage
wedge deformities
Summary Summary The relationship between social disadvantage and bone mineral density (BMD) is complex and remains unclear; furthermore, little is known of the relationship with vertebral deformities. We observed social disadvantage to be associated with BMD for females, independent of body mass index (BMI). A lower prevalence of vertebral deformities was observed for disadvantaged males.

Introduction The relationship between social disadvantage and BMD appears complex and remains unclear, and little is known about the association between social disadvantage and vertebral wedge deformities. We examined the relationship between social disadvantage, BMD and wedge deformities in older adults from the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort.

Methods BMD and wedge deformities were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and associations with extreme social disadvantage was examined in 1,074 randomly recruited population-based adults (51 % female). Socioeconomic status was assessed by Socio-economic Indexes for Areas values derived from residential addresses using Australian Bureau of Statistics 2001 census data. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-report. Regression models were adjusted for age, BMI, dietary calcium, serum vitamin D (25(OH)D), smoking, alcohol, physical inactivity, calcium/vitamin D supplements, glucocorticoids and hormone therapy (females only).

Results Compared with other males, socially disadvantaged males were older (65.9 years versus 61.9 years, p = 0.008) and consumed lower dietary calcium and alcohol (both p ≤ 0.03). Socially disadvantaged females had greater BMI (29.9 ± 5.9 versus 27.6 ± 5.3, p = 0.002) and consumed less alcohol (p = 0.003) compared with other females. Socially disadvantaged males had fewer wedge deformities compared with other males (33.3 % versus 45.4 %, p = 0.05). After adjustment, social disadvantage was negatively associated with hip BMD for females (p = 0.02), but not for males (p = 0.70), and showed a trend for fewer wedge deformities for males (p = 0.06) but no association for females (p = 0.85).

Conclusions Social disadvantage appears to be associated with BMD for females, independent of BMI and other osteoporosis risk factors. A lower prevalence of vertebral deformities was observed for males of extreme social disadvantage. Further research is required to elucidate potential mechanisms for these associations.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050517

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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