Assessing the effectiveness of the cognitive interview for children with severe intellectual disabilities

Milne, Rebecca, Sharman, Stefanie J., Powell, Martine B. and Mead, Sarah 2013, Assessing the effectiveness of the cognitive interview for children with severe intellectual disabilities, International journal of disability, development and education, vol. 60, no. 1, Special Issue: Witnesses with Intellectual Disabilities, pp. 18-29.

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Title Assessing the effectiveness of the cognitive interview for children with severe intellectual disabilities
Author(s) Milne, Rebecca
Sharman, Stefanie J.
Powell, Martine B.
Mead, Sarah
Journal name International journal of disability, development and education
Volume number 60
Issue number 1
Season Special Issue: Witnesses with Intellectual Disabilities
Start page 18
End page 29
Total pages 12
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1034-912X
Keyword(s) cognitive interview
video-taped event
suggestibility
recall
misleading questions
leading questions
intellectual disabilities
child witnesses
Summary We examined whether the cognitive interview (CI) procedure increased event recall in children with severe intellectual disabilities (ID) compared with children with no ID. Forty-six children with and without ID watched a videotaped event; they were aged between eight and 11 years. The next day they were individually interviewed using the CI or a structured interview (SI). Interviews consisted of free recall and specific questions, some of which contained leading or misleading information. The leading and misleading questions determined children’s susceptibility to information presented after the event. Overall, children without ID reported more correct information than children with ID. For all children, the CI led to more correct recall than the SI without increases in incorrect details or confabulations. Although the CI did not decrease children’s susceptibility to the misleading questions compared with the SI, children without ID disagreed with more of the misleading suggestions than children with ID. These results suggest that the CI may indeed be a valuable tool to elicit information from very vulnerable witnesses.
Language eng
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050534

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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