Sticking around : why and how some social workers stay in the profession

Chiller, Phoebe and Crisp, Beth R. 2012, Sticking around : why and how some social workers stay in the profession, Practice : social work in action, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 211-224.

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Title Sticking around : why and how some social workers stay in the profession
Author(s) Chiller, Phoebe
Crisp, Beth R.
Journal name Practice : social work in action
Volume number 24
Issue number 4
Start page 211
End page 224
Total pages 14
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2012-09
ISSN 0950-3153
Keyword(s) workforce retention
professional passion
social workers
Australia
Summary Although much is known about why social workers leave the profession, much less is known about what enables some social workers to remain working in highly stressful situations for many years and retain a passion for their work. Based on in-depth interviews with six Australian social workers with at least 10 years practice experience, factors associated with retention included self-awareness, a sense of perspective, having a strong professional identity, a sense of humour, the ability to recognise and respond to the emotional impact of the work, clear separation of work and home, and a mental interlude of some intermediate activity between leaving work and arriving home. Whereas previous research has depicted job change as a sign of burnout, for participants in this study changing jobs was regarded as a preventive measure which enabled them to continue in social work.
Language eng
Field of Research 160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Services
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050545

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Higher Education Research Group
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