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Gaining a past, losing a future : Web 2.0 and internet historicity

Allen, Matthew 2012, Gaining a past, losing a future : Web 2.0 and internet historicity, Media international Australia, vol. 143, pp. 99-109.

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Title Gaining a past, losing a future : Web 2.0 and internet historicity
Author(s) Allen, MatthewORCID iD for Allen, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0002-8882-8763
Journal name Media international Australia
Volume number 143
Start page 99
End page 109
Total pages 11
Publisher University of Queensland : School of English, Media Studies & Art History
Place of publication St Lucia, Qld.
Publication date 2012-05
ISSN 1329-878X
2200-467X
Keyword(s) internet
historicity
Summary This article explore how, in the first decade of the twenty-first century, the internet became historicised, meaning that its public existence is now explicitly framed through a narrative that locates the current internet in relation to a past internet. Up until this time, in popular culture, the internet had been understood mainly as the future-in-the-present, as if it had no past. The internet might have had a history, but it had no historicity. That has changed because of Web 2.0, and the effects of Tim O'Reilly's creative marketing of that label. Web 2.0, in this sense not a technology or practice but the marker of a discourse of historical interpretation dependent on versions, created for us a second version of the web, different from (and yet connected to) that of the 1990s. This historicising moment aligned the past and future in ways suitable to those who might control or manage the present. And while Web 3.0, implied or real, suggests the 'future', it also marks out a loss of other times, or the possibility of alterity understood through temporality.
Language eng
Field of Research 209999 Language, Communication and Culture not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2012
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050606

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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