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The artist in a networked society

Barbour, Kim 2012, The artist in a networked society, Melbourne, Vic., 12-14 Dec. 2012, [Melbourne, Vic.], The Conference.

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Title The artist in a networked society
Creator(s) Barbour, Kim
Conference, exhibition or event name Celebrity Studies. Conference (1st : 2012 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference, exhibition or event location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference, exhibition or event dates 12-14 Dec. 2012
Publication date 2012
Conference series Celebrity Studies Conference
Description of resource Conference presentation
Publisher The Conference
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Keyword(s) artistic identity
online persona
phenomenology
artists myth
Summary Artists are under pressure from two conflicting sets of sociocultural expectations. On the one hand, they are expected to conform to the historically grounded myth of the artist as heroic genius. On the other hand, they must meet the expectations of the state (plus ensure their own survival) as economic contributors. One way  that these conflicting pressures are managed by artists working within the traditional art world is by separating the creator from the labourer through the use of intermediaries such as dealer galleries, critics, publishers and agents. This allows the artist to symbolically distance themselves from the economic structures that allow them to continue to work. However, for those artists working outside of these systems of support, legitimization and representation, the positioning of the individual as ‘artist’ becomes a much more complex task.

The construction of artists persona in online spaces can be seen most clearly in those artists who operate outside of the traditional art world. Lacking the symbolic distance between the economic producer and the bohemian, mythical genius, these individual artists instead negotiate a place to stand in direct relation to  their audience of fans, followers and audiences. Using examples from a range of fringe, alternative or counter-culture creative practice, this paper investigates artistic persona by linking the artist myth, economic considerations, and networked society to explore current presentation strategies. 
Language eng
Field of Research 200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
200212 Screen and Media Culture
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category EN Other conference paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050617

Document type: Conference, Exhibition or Event
Collection: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2013, 09:55:17 EST by Kim Barbour

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